tooth fairy

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tooth fairy

1. A mythical fairy that exchanges money for children's baby teeth that have fallen out and been placed beneath their pillow at night. My sister believed in the tooth fairy until she was nearly 15. Look, Mom! The tooth fairy left me a whole dollar for my molar last night!
2. Any mythical benefactor or source of money. The tooth fairy isn't going to come along and fund this project for us.
See also: fairy, tooth
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

tooth fairy

A mythical source of bounty, as in So who will finance this venture-the tooth fairy? This expression refers to the fairy credited with leaving money under a child's pillow in place of a baby tooth that has fallen out, a practice popular with American parents since the first half of the 1900s.
See also: fairy, tooth
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Debbie Hill, managing director of Tooth Fairies, said: "For dental practices this is very good news, the Welsh Government is paying to train up the dental nurses and practices can also apply for a wage subsidy when they take on the newly trained staff."
Tooth Fairies will train recruits to Level 3 Dental Nursing Apprenticeships.
He informed me, highly disappointed, that most of his classmates "got 20 bucks." I couldn't, of course, explain that there are many Tooth Fairies, but it occurred to me that my father, dealing with me 46 years ago, didn't have to deal with kindergarten economic discussions in quite the same way I have to today.
Tooth Fairies is being launched this month to make the loss of a child's first baby tooth that little bit special - instead of the traditional coin under the pillow the tooth is set in a special mount as a permanent keepsake.
Cordelia, 23, from Bristol, said yesterday: "Tooth fairies seemed appropriate.
"Guzman might well have the tooth fairies leaving something under his pillow when my man sparks him.
However, things take an unexpected turn for him when he shatters a young child's dreams when he tells his girlfriend's daughter that tooth fairies aren't real.