take to (one's) heels

(redirected from took to his heels)

take to (one's) heels

To flee or run away. The youths took to their heels when they heard the police officers approaching.
See also: heel, take

take to one's heels

Fig. to run away. The little boy said hello and then took to his heels. The man took to his heels to try to get to the bus stop before the bus left.
See also: heel, take

take to one's heels

Run away, as in When the burglar alarm went off they took to their heels. This expression alludes to the fact that the heels are all one sees of a fugitive running away fast. Although similar expressions turned up from Shakespeare's time on, the exact idiom dates only from the first half of the 1800s. Also see show one's heels.
See also: heel, take

take to your heels

LITERARY
If you take to your heels, you run away. He took to his heels and rushed out of the room.
See also: heel, take

take to your heels (or legs)

run away.
See also: heel, take

ˌtake to your ˈheels

run away very quickly: The burglars took to their heels when they heard the police arrive.
See also: heel, take

take to (one's) heels

To run away; flee.
See also: heel, take
References in classic literature ?
At last he could bear it no longer; so he took to his heels, and off he ran in a very sad and sorrowful mood.
Immediately on her entering the garden gate, the family of hens half ran, half flew to meet her; while a strange grimalkin, which was prowling under the parlor window, took to his heels, clambered hastily over the fence, and vanished.
At the sight of them the rough took to his heels, and was instantly screened from view by a veil of his friends and neighbors.
Lop-Ear was a year older than I, but I was several times angrier than he, and in the end he took to his heels.
Then at a certain point terror seized him and he took to his heels in the direction of Goat Island.
It was then the idea came to Bert that he was altogether too conspicuous in the middle of the bridge, and that he took to his heels towards Goat Island.
His shot produced no other effect than to increase the speed of the buffalo, and to frighten his own horse, who took to his heels, and scampered off with all the ammunition.
Don Quixote was getting up to chastise him, but he took to his heels at such a pace that no one attempted to follow him; and mightily chapfallen was Don Quixote at Andres' story, and the others had to take great care to restrain their laughter so as not to put him entirely out of countenance.
I followed them out of the room, and down the passage, the Professor murmuring to himself, all the time, as a kind of aid to his feeble memory, "C, C, C; Couch, Cooling-Draught, Correct-Grammar," till, in turning a corner, he met Sylvie and Bruno, so suddenly that the startled Professor let go of his fat pupil, who instantly took to his heels.
The accused who lived in the same house with the complainant stole her ATM cards and took to his heels,' the prosecutor submitted.
He took to his heels twice along an Annan street with officers in hot pursuit.
Two other men sped away by a motorbike and one man took to his heels towards Kalma Chowk, claimed the eyewitnesses.
As David Raju lunged at Lakshmi Prasad to jab him with the syringe, the hospital superintendent took to his heels, but in the melee the infected blood spilt on Lakshmi Prasad's shirt and floor.
Sources said even the person named Ranjodha, who claimed to be the owner of the firm, had faked his identity and took to his heels with the money collected from the investors.
He struck one blow to each of the two white males who attacked him and he then took to his heels and ran away.