take to (one's) heels

(redirected from took to her heels)

take to (one's) heels

To flee or run away. The youths took to their heels when they heard the police officers approaching.
See also: heel, take

take to one's heels

Fig. to run away. The little boy said hello and then took to his heels. The man took to his heels to try to get to the bus stop before the bus left.
See also: heel, take

take to one's heels

Run away, as in When the burglar alarm went off they took to their heels. This expression alludes to the fact that the heels are all one sees of a fugitive running away fast. Although similar expressions turned up from Shakespeare's time on, the exact idiom dates only from the first half of the 1800s. Also see show one's heels.
See also: heel, take

take to your heels

LITERARY
If you take to your heels, you run away. He took to his heels and rushed out of the room.
See also: heel, take

take to your heels (or legs)

run away.
See also: heel, take

ˌtake to your ˈheels

run away very quickly: The burglars took to their heels when they heard the police arrive.
See also: heel, take

take to (one's) heels

To run away; flee.
See also: heel, take
References in classic literature ?
By this time the hounds were quite near, and the Hare took to her heels and luckily escaped.
She suddenly took to her heels with the speed of the wind, and, without looking behind her, ran along the road till she came to a gate which opened directly into a plantation.
All of a sudden, Tarja spotted something moving in the bushes and just took to her heels and shot off, which is very unlike her as she is usually really friendly and playful and doesn't go off like that.
The Doctor Who star took to her heels yesterday during filming for her latest movie.
Then I shall go on coming to you," and he went on doggedly, puffing and whistling and drawing nearer every minute, even when the guard took to her heels in panic.
She bought the ices and then it was on your marks, get set, go as she took to her heels, leaving Beatrice and Eugenie trailing in the sprint to the entrance.