take leave of (someone or something)

(redirected from took their leave of)

take leave of (someone or something)

To depart from someone or something. A possessive adjective can be used between "take" and "leave." Unfortunately, it's time for me to take my leave of you lovely people. She took leave of the party as soon as she was able to give her well wishes to the hosts.
See also: leave, of, take

take leave of someone or something

to go away from someone or something. It is time for me to take leave of all of you. It saddened me to take leave of the city I grew up in.
See also: leave, of, take

take leave of

1. Also, take one's leave of. Depart from, say good-bye to. For example, Sorry but I have to take leave of you now, or After the movie we'll take our leave of you. [Mid-1200s]
2. take leave of one's senses. Behave irrationally, act crazy, as in Give them the keys to the house? Have you taken leave of your senses? [Late 1800s] Also see come to one's senses.
See also: leave, of, take
References in classic literature ?
Sancho entered, and the curate and the barber took their leave of Don Quixote, of whose recovery they despaired when they saw how wedded he was to his crazy ideas, and how saturated with the nonsense of his unlucky chivalry; and said the curate to the barber, "You will see, gossip, that when we are least thinking of it, our gentleman will be off once more for another flight."
As some three million people took their leave of the Eternal City under the dark skies, Rome seemed to be weeping for the man from a far country who had said during his installation in 1978 that he was "now a Roman."