take the words (right) out of (one's) mouth

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take the words (right) out of (one's) mouth

To unknowingly say what someone else is thinking or about to say. You took the words out of my mouth—I think she looks gorgeous, too! Well, I was about to give the same explanation, but you've taken the words right out of my mouth.
See also: mouth, of, out, take, word
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take the words out of someone's mouth

Fig. to say something just before someone else was going to say the same thing; to say something that someone who agrees with you might have said. That is exactly right! You took the words right out of my mouth! When you said "expensive," you took the words right out of my mouth!
See also: mouth, of, out, take, word

(You) took the words right out of my mouth.

Inf. Fig. You said exactly what I meant to say before I had a chance to say it, and, therefore, I agree with you very much. Bill: I think she's old enough to know better. Tom: You took the words right out of my mouth. Mary: This movie is going to put me to sleep. Jane (yawning): You took the words right out of my mouth.
See also: mouth, of, out, right, took, word
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take the words out of someone's mouth

Anticipate what someone is about to say; also, completely agree with someone. For example, When you mentioned her dislike of fish you took the words right out of my mouth, or You took the words out of my mouth when you said he was stupid. This idiom was first recorded in 1574.
See also: mouth, of, out, take, word
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take the words out of someone's mouth

If you take the words out of someone's mouth, you say the thing that they were just about to say. `Let's have lunch.' — `Ah, you took the words right out of my mouth, Lisa.'
See also: mouth, of, out, take, word
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

take the words out of someone's mouth

say what someone else was about to say.
See also: mouth, of, out, take, word
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take the words (right) out of somebody’s ˈmouth

say exactly what another person was going to say: ‘The speed limit on motorways should be raised.’ ‘I agree completely! You’ve taken the words right out of my mouth!’
See also: mouth, of, out, take, word
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

words right out of one's mouth, to take

To agree with someone completely; to anticipate what someone else is about to say. This vivid image was expressed as long ago as the sixteenth century. Richard Grafton used it in A Chronicle at Large (1568; published 1809): “The Pope . . . takying their wordes out of their mouthes, said . . .”
See also: of, out, right, take, to, word
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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