take off

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take off

1. verb Literally, to physically remove something or someone from someone, oneself, or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." He took off his shoes before entering the house. Someone has taken the picture off the wall. The police began taking passengers off the airplane.
2. verb To decrease; to remove from an existing amount. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." They offered to take a further 10% off if we signed up for paper-free billing. I'm trying to take off a few pounds ahead of the wedding so I can fit into my suit.
3. verb To release something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." Please don't take your seat belt off until the car is in park. He took off the restraining bolt so that the cattle could push their way through the gate.
4. verb To rise into the air in flight. What time does the plane take off? They've already taken off, so it's too late to say goodbye.
5. verb To increase in activity very rapidly and to a large degree. Sales really took off after we got that movie star to appear in our advertisements. My career didn't take off until I moved to Los Angeles. The party really took off after 9 PM.
6. verb To steal or take something without permission. In this usage, the phrase is typically followed by "with (something)." The thief took off with my bicycle. I think John took off with the car. He is in so much trouble when he comes back!
7. verb To leave or move very quickly. The kids took off as soon as they heard the sirens. After the accident, the car took off before I could get the license plate number.
8. verb To depart for someplace. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." Sorry, I need to take off or I'll be late for my meeting. He took himself off to his grandfather's cabin in the woods to think about all that had happened.
9. verb To remove someone from some activity or endeavor. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." I can't believe they took us off the project after all the work we did for it! She's taking herself off the investigation due to a conflict of interest.
10. noun The act of rising into the air in flight. As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated or spelled as one word. Please prepare for takeoff. Takeoff was a bit rough, but the rest of the flight was smooth.
See also: off, take

take someone or something off (something)

to remove someone or something from the surface of something. Bob helped take his children off the merry-go-round. Please take your books off the table.
See also: off, take

take someone or something off

Sl. to rob someone or something. (Underworld.) Weren't you in that bunch that took the bank off in Philly? No, we never took off no bank, did we, Lefty?
See also: off, take

take someone off

Sl. to kill someone. (Underworld.) The mob took the witness off a week before the trial. Bar-lowe didn't want to have to take off Lefty, but he was afraid he might talk.
See also: off, take

take something off

to remove something, such as an article of clothing. Please take your coat off and stay awhile. Please take off your coat.
See also: off, take

take off (on something)

to start out speaking on something; to begin a discussion of something. My father took off on the subject of taxes and talked for an hour. My uncle is always taking off on the state of the economy.
See also: off, take

take off

 (for some place)
1. Lit. to take flight, heading for some place. We took off for Moscow early in the evening. We took off at dawn.
2. Fig. to leave for some place. The girls took off for home when they heard the dinner bell. It's late. I have to take off.
See also: off, take

take off

 
1. Fig. to leave the ground and begin to fly. (As with a bird or an airplane.) When do we take off? The eagle took off and headed toward the mountains.
2. Fig. [for someone] to leave in a hurry. She really took off from there quickly. I've got to take off—I'm late.
3. Fig. [for something] to start selling well. The fluffy dog dolls began to take off, and we sold out the lot. Ticket sales really took off after the first performance.
4. Fig. to become active and exciting. Did the party ever take off, or was it dull all night? Things began to take off about midnight.
See also: off, take

take off

(after someone or something) and take out (after someone or something) to begin to chase someone or something. The bank guard took off after the robber. Did you see that police car take off? It took out after the bank robber's car.
See also: off, take

take off

1. Remove, as in Take off your coat and stay for a while, or I took my foot off the brake. [c. 1300]
2. Deduct, decrease, as in He took 20 percent off the original price, or I want you to trim my hair, but please don't take off too much. [c. 1700]
3. Carry or take away, as in The passengers were taken off one by one. [Late 1800s]
4. Also, take oneself off. Leave, go away, as in I'm taking off now, or We take ourselves off for China next month, or, as an imperative, Take yourself off right now! [First half of 1800s]
5. Move forward quickly, as in The dog took off after the car.
6. Become well known or popular, or achieve sudden growth, as in That actor's career has really taken off, or Sales took off around the holidays. [Mid-1900s]
7. Rise in flight, as in The airplane took off on time. [Mid-1800s]
8. Discontinue, as in The railroad took off the commuter special. [Mid-1700s]
9. Imitate humorously or satirically, as in He had a way of taking off the governor that made us howl with laughter. [Mid-1700s]
10. Withhold service, as in I'm taking off from work today because of the funeral. [First half of 1900s]
See also: off, take

take off

v.
1. To remove something from something that is supporting it: I took the books off the shelf. I took off all the vases from the ledge and dusted them. Please take the clothes off the clothesline.
2. To remove some article of clothing: She took her coat off. I'll take off my boots.
3. To release something that holds or restrains: I took the brake off and the car began to roll. Take the top straps off your boots and you'll be more comfortable. The driving instructor never takes off the seatbelt in the car.
4. To deduct some amount from some quantity: The discount dealer took ten percent off the normal price. The teacher takes off five points for each mistake on the quiz.
5. To leave, especially quickly: As soon as I told them you were coming, they took off. We took off to the beach for the weekend.
6. To rise into the air or begin flight: The plane took off on time.
7. To increase greatly in activity, success, or number: The actor's career took off. That new movie really took off. Sales took off around the holidays.
8. To proceed further on the basis of something; elaborate on something: The writer took off on my story and wrote a whole novel. I started the project, but my sister really took off with it.
9. To begin expressing oneself strongly: I told him about the new tax laws, and he took off about how much more money he would have to pay.
10. To withhold service due, as from one's work: I'm taking off three days during May. I'm taking a couple of days off from work to spend with my children.
11. To stop prescribing or administering to someone some medicine or other corrective that is taken or undertaken routinely: The doctor took me off the medicine when I got healthy.
12. take off on To mock something by imitating it: The comedy show took off on the evening news.
See also: off, take

take off

1. in. [for someone] to leave in a hurry. I’ve got to take off—I’m late.
2. in. [for something] to start selling well. The fluffy dog dolls began to take off, and we sold out the lot.
3. n. an imitation of something; a copy of something. (Usually take-off.) This robot is capable of producing 200 circuit board take-offs per hour.
4. n. a parody of someone or something. (Usually with on. Usually take-off.) The comedian did a take-off on the wealthy senator.
5. n. a robbery. (Underworld. Usually take-off.) That was some take-off Lefty pulled, huh?
See also: off, take

take someone off

tv. to kill someone. (Underworld.) The mob took the witness off a week before the trial.
See also: off, someone, take
References in periodicals archive ?
The jets, which can carry up to 30 tons of bombs, took off with a deafening roar
The Air France Concorde took off yesterday from Charles de Gaulle airport - the scene of July's crash
The aircraft took off at a weight of 22,100lbs - fuel accounts for 18,100lbs of this to enable the aircraft to circumnavigate the globe non-stop.
Abhay Pathak, Air India Regional Manager for the Gulf, Middle East and Africa told Gulf News there was absolutely no problem when the plane took off from the Abu Dhabi International Airport around midnight.
Meanwhile, Greek M-2000 jets that took off from Tanagra base harassed Turkish F-4 and F-16 jets conducting training flights for 15 minutes beginning at 10.
The airlines' flights to Southeast Asia also took off as per schedule.
Peter Watkins, JT Aultz, Emmanuel Guzman, and Mika Edin took off from Vox headquarters with Ed Dominick at the wheel.
People didn't notice,'' Perez said of Hudson Bank's first race, ``but past the wire he got so mad he took off (running hard).
Airbus' giant A380 aircraft took off Wednesday (4 May) for its second test flight.
A WAVE of B-52 bombers, which are expected to play a key role in the bombing of Iraq, took off yesterday from RAF Fairford.
03: The second of the landmark towers hit by a United Airlines Boeing 767, also hijacked after it took off from Boston en route to Los Angeles.
One victim, a nurse, told the court: "He took off his jacket, then took off his belt and swivelled it round his waist.
14, aspindly, ungainly, plastic-and-paper aircraft, dragging its fuel-laden wings, took off from EDwards Air Force Base, Calif.
Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer Mission Control announced that the Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer has overcome its first major challenge when it successfully took off for its round-the-world record attempt from Salina Airport, Kansas at 18:47:10 CST (00:47:10 UTC).
Sources told that the plane took off from Faisal Base in Karachi and soon after taking off all contact with the plane with the control tower was lost and seven minutes after taking off it crashed.