too posh to push

too posh to push

Unwilling to go through the physical pain of giving birth to a baby vaginally, choosing instead to opt to have a caesarean section. It wasn't unusual for my mother's generation to spend literal days in labor, but it seems like I hear about more and more women these days who are too posh to push and would rather just go under the knife instead.
See also: push

too posh to push

People sometimes rudely say that a woman is too posh to push if she does not give birth to a baby by pushing it out of her body, but instead chooses to have an operation to take it out. There are plenty of well-off mothers who are too posh to push.
See also: push

too posh to push

(of a mother-to-be, especially a well-to-do one) unwilling to suffer the discomfort and indignity of conventional labour, and therefore opting for a caesarean section.
2004 Richmond News (British Columbia) Some modern gals have been labeled as ‘too posh to push’ and demand a quick delivery by scalpel rather than a slow stretch in the stirrups.
See also: push
References in periodicals archive ?
It wasn't so much that the sheep was too posh to push, it was more that the lamb was too big to come out.
NOT TOO POSH TO PUSH Mel B & Keith Lemon wheel a trolley Pictures: SPLASH
If like me you were forced to have an emergency C-section you're considered a fake, "too posh to push" and the fierce competition that is motherhood commences.
The 33-year-old - who presents Channel 4's A Place in the Sun and Channel 5's Cowboy Builders - wanted to have the procedure but felt staff reckoned she was "too posh to push".
It will be a Caesarean at the end of September but not because I'm "too posh to push".
Celebrities Victoria Beckham, Patsy Kensit and Liz Hurley are among the mothers who have plumped for the scheduled operation, known as a C-section, giving rise to the phrase "too posh to push".
But, by the same token, women who are "too posh to push" should not qualify.
More and more women are going the Victoria Beckham way whose desire for caesarean over natural birthing led to coinage of the term "too posh to push".
The citation from Song (2004) on page 21 commencing "Actress Elizabeth Hurley had one." should have continued into the second paragraph and included: "What all these women had are C-sections, and finished with " Some, as the British tabloids have put it are simply too posh to push" (Song, 2004).
It could also be a cultural trend after many celebrities were reported as 'too posh to push'," he said.
Was he, to use his own words "too posh to push" in an era when being, as he is, an Old Etonian, is a positive disadvantage.
Escalating numbers of Caesareans have previously prompted fears that mums are becoming "too posh to push".