tomorrow


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Related to tomorrow: Tomorrow Is Another Day

as if there's no tomorrow

Very rapidly and eagerly; without restraint or thought (i.e., as if there won't be another opportunity, so one must do something as much or as quickly as possible). He must be starving, because Jonathan is wolfing down his food as if there's no tomorrow! Every time Kevin goes out shopping, he starts spending money as if there's no tomorrow.
See also: if, no, tomorrow

as if there was/were no tomorrow

Very rapidly and eagerly; without restraint or thought (i.e., as if there won't be another opportunity, so one must do something as much or as quickly as possible). He must have been starving, because Jonathan started wolfing down his food as if there was no tomorrow! Every time Kevin goes out shopping, he starts spending money as if there were no tomorrow.
See also: if, no, there, tomorrow

like there ain't no tomorrow

colloquial Very rapidly and eagerly; without restraint or thought (i.e., as if there won't be another opportunity, so one must do something as much or as quickly as possible). He must have been starving, because Jonathan started wolfing down his food like there ain't no tomorrow! Every time Kevin goes out shopping, he starts spending money like there ain't no tomorrow.
See also: like, no, there, tomorrow

like there were no tomorrow

Very rapidly and eagerly; without restraint or thought (i.e., as if there won't be another opportunity, so one must do something as much or as quickly as possible). He must have been starving, because Jonathan started wolfing down his food like there were no tomorrow! Every time Kevin goes out shopping, he starts spending money like there were no tomorrow.
See also: like, no, there, tomorrow

Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today.

Do not delay or hesitate to do something if you can finish or accomplish it today. A: "I've just got one more short assignment and then I'll be finished with my homework, but I think I'll wait until Sunday to do it." B: "You'll enjoy your weekend more if you do it now. Remember, never put off until tomorrow what you can do today!"
See also: can, never, off, put, tomorrow, until, what

eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die

A call for others to enjoy themselves, usually in the context of a party or other festive gathering. The phrase is often shortened to "eat, drink, and be merry." Come on, people, this is a party—eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die!
See also: and, die, tomorrow, we

jam tomorrow

An empty, useless promise of something that will never arrive or be fulfilled. (A reference to Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass, in which the White Queen offers Alice "jam to-morrow and jam yesterday—but never jam to-day.") Primarily heard in UK, Australia. The few staff who are still with us are growing tired of promises of jam tomorrow, while having to endure longer hours with less pay.
See also: jam, tomorrow

like there was no tomorrow

Very rapidly and eagerly; without restraint or thought (i.e., as if there wouldn't be another opportunity, so something had to be done as much or as quickly as possible). He must have been starving, because Jonathan started wolfing down his food like there was no tomorrow!
See also: like, no, there, tomorrow

like there's no tomorrow

Very rapidly and eagerly; without restraint or thought (i.e., as if there won't be another opportunity, so something has to be done as much or as quickly as possible). He must have been starving, because Jonathan started wolfing down his food like there's no tomorrow! Every time Kevin goes out shopping he spends money like there's no tomorrow.
See also: like, no, tomorrow

here today, (and) gone tomorrow

Said of something that is short-lived. I can't believe I've already spent the money I got for my birthday. Here today, gone tomorrow!
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

put off

1. verb To deter, annoy, or repel. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "put" and "off." I don't know if you realize how much you put people off with your attitude. He has a knack for putting off his dates.
2. verb To delay doing or dealing with something; to procrastinate instead of doing something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "put" and "off." Why did I keep putting off working on this essay? Now I'll be up all night writing it. If you put off getting car insurance, you could wind up in jail if you get in an accident. I'm sorry I didn't call you sooner. I should never have put it off.
3. verb To delay meeting with or avoid dealing with someone. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "put" and "off." I'm sorry I've been putting you off lately; it's just been really hectic in work and at home. Has Helen said anything to you about me recently? I feel like she's putting me off.
4. adjective Deterred, annoyed, or repelled (by something). I could tell he was a bit put off by my comments. Please don't spread the news about the robbery. We don't want our guests put off at the idea of staying with us overnight.
See also: off, put

tomorrow is another day

Tomorrow will bring a chance for a better result, despire recent misfortunes, unpleasantness, or lack of success I know you're upset about losing the game, sweetie, but tomorrow is another day. I'm so frustrated with how things went. Oh well, no sense dwelling on it—tomorrow's another day.
See also: another, tomorrow

as if there was no tomorrow

Without restraint; in the most extreme manner (i.e., as if motivated by the fact that there won't be another opportunity). He must have been starving, because Jonathan started wolfing down his food as if there was no tomorrow! Every time Kevin goes out shopping he spends money as if there was no tomorrow.
See also: if, no, there, tomorrow

a week tomorrow/on (some day)/etc.

One week from the day specified. Primarily heard in UK. I'm flying to Ireland a week on Saturday for my brother's wedding. We need that report finished a week tomorrow.
See also: on, tomorrow, week

a week yesterday/last (some day)/etc.

One week before the day specified. They only gave me the assignment a week yesterday, so I'm really stressed out about getting it finished by tomorrow. Chris left on his work trip a week last Tuesday.
See also: last, week, yesterday

(I'll) see you tomorrow

I will meet you again at some point in time tomorrow. Have a good night, Tom. See you tomorrow. That's it for the lecture today, class. Be sure to read the chapters I've assigned, and I'll see you tomorrow.
See also: see, tomorrow

spend money like it's going out of style

To spend money very quickly and in great quantities. We had a table of people in the restaurant last night who were obviously very wealthy, because they spent money like it was going out of style. After getting his Christmas bonus, Jim started spending money like it was going out of style.
See also: going, like, money, of, out, spend, style

Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die.

Prov. Enjoy yourself whenever you can, because you may die soon. ("Eat, drink, and be merry" by itself is simply a way of encouraging people to enjoy themselves.) Fred: No cake for me, thank you. I'm on a diet. Jane: But, Fred, this is a birthday party. Eat, drink, and be merry. Natasha encouraged all her guests to eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die.
See also: and, die, tomorrow, we

Here today, (and) gone tomorrow.

Prov. Available now, but soon to be gone. (Used to describe something that does not last-often an opportunity). The stores near my house don't stay in business very long—here today, and gone tomorrow. If you want this carpet, buy it now. This sale price is here today, gone tomorrow.
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

(I'll) see you tomorrow.

I will see you when we meet again tomorrow. (Typically said to someone whose daily schedule is the same as one's own.) Bob: Bye, Jane. Jane: Good night, Bob. See you tomorrow. Sue: See you tomorrow. Jane: Until tomorrow. Bye.
See also: see, tomorrow

like there's no tomorrow

 and like there ain't no tomorrow
Rur. eagerly; rapidly; without stopping. You can't go on eating candy bars like there's no tomorrow. Jim's spending money like there's no tomorrow.
See also: like, no, tomorrow

put someone off

 
1. to delay dealing with someone until a later time. I hate to keep putting you off, but we are not ready to deal with you yet. I had to put off the plumber again. He really wants his money.
2. to repel someone; to distress someone. You really put people off with your scowling face. You put off people with your arrogance.
3. to avoid or evade someone. I don't wish to see Mr. Brown now. Please put him off. I won't talk to reporters. Tell them something that will put them off. Put off those annoying people!
See also: off, put

put someone off (of) something

 and put someone off
to remove someone from a form of transportation, such as a train, ship, or airplane, owing to illness or misbehavior. (See also put someone off. Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The captain ordered that the unruly passengers be put off the ship at the next port. We put the thief off at the dock.
See also: off, put

put something off

to postpone something; to schedule something for a later time. I have to put off our meeting until a later time. I put off a visit to the dentist as long as I could.
See also: off, put

spend money like it's going out of style

 and spend money like there's no tomorrow
Fig. to spend money recklessly; to spend money as if it were worthless or will soon be worthless. Extravagant? she spends money like it's going out of style! I can't control it. I spend money like there is no tomorrow.
See also: going, like, money, of, out, spend, style

Today here, tomorrow the world.

Prov. Successful in this location now, with later recognition in the rest of the world. (Describes something whose influence seems certain to spread. The name of an appropriate locality is usually substituted for here.) I thought that silly fashion in clothes was unique to California, but it seems to be spreading. Today Los Angeles, tomorrow the world.
See also: today, tomorrow, world

Tomorrow is another day.

Prov. Things may improve tomorrow; tomorrow you will have a chance to solve the problems that are upsetting you today. (Often used to encourage someone to relax and wait until tomorrow to do or worry about something.) Child: This math homework is horrible! I can't do it! Mother: Put it away for tonight and go to bed. You'll be able to think more clearly when you've had some sleep, and tomorrow is another day.
See also: another, tomorrow

Tomorrow never comes.

Prov. When the day arrives that you are now calling "tomorrow," you will call that day "today" and a different day will be called "tomorrow." (Therefore, you should not resolve to do something tomorrow, since that day will never arrive.) Jill: When are you going to go to lunch with me? Jane: Tomorrow. Jill: Tomorrow never comes.
See also: come, never, tomorrow

here today, gone tomorrow

Lacking permanence, fleeting. For example, His book attracted a great deal of attention but quickly went out of print-here today and gone tomorrow . Originally alluding to the briefness of the human lifespan, this phrase was first recorded in John Calvin's Life and Conversion of a Christian Man (1549): "This proverb that man is here today and gone tomorrow."
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

never put off until tomorrow

see under put off.
See also: never, off, put, tomorrow, until

put off

Delay or postpone, as in He always puts off paying his bills. This idiom, dating from the late 1300s, gave rise to the proverb Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today, first recorded in the late 1300s (in Chaucer's Tale of Melibee) and repeated ever since. Also see put one off.
See also: off, put

tomorrow is another day

One may not accomplish everything today but will have another chance. For example, We've stuffed hundreds of envelopes and still aren't done, but tomorrow is another day . This comforting maxim was first put as Tomorrow is a new day about 1520, was widely repeated, and changed to its present form in the mid-1800s.
See also: another, tomorrow

jam tomorrow

mainly BRITISH
If you say jam tomorrow, you mean that someone often promises that something good is going to happen but that, in reality, it never seems to happen. The government's big plans for education are no more than jam tomorrow. Note: Jam today is used to refer to the idea that people can have something immediately, rather than having to wait. Economists generally assume that most people value jam today more highly than the same quantity of jam tomorrow. Note: This expression is often used to suggest that people are in fact unlikely to receive what they have been promised. Note: This expression comes from the children's story `Through the Looking Glass', by Lewis Carroll, where the Red Queen says, `The rule is jam tomorrow and jam yesterday, but never jam today.' As the main character, Alice, points out, this means that nobody will ever get any jam.
See also: jam, tomorrow

here today, gone tomorrow

or

here today and gone tomorrow

If something or someone is here today, gone tomorrow or here today and gone tomorrow, they are only present or only exist for a short time. There have been numerous schemes designed to provide children who are here today, gone tomorrow with the same educational opportunities as settled children. The freedom that they have is not true freedom, and that's because it's here today and gone tomorrow. Note: Journalists sometimes use here today, gone tomorrow before a noun. The presenter described him as a `here today, gone tomorrow minister'. Note: This expression is used to show disapproval.
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

like there's no tomorrow

If someone does something like there's no tomorrow, they do it a lot, without thinking about the consequences. They are spending money like there's no tomorrow. Note: You can also say that someone does something as if there were no tomorrow or as if there was no tomorrow with the same meaning. No wonder they danced as if there were no tomorrow.
See also: like, no, tomorrow

tomorrow is another day

When something bad has happened, you say tomorrow is another day to mean that things may be better in the future. I didn't play well, but tomorrow is another day. Note: This expression comes from the novel `Gone with the Wind' by Margaret Mitchell, where, after a series of disasters, the character Scarlett O'Hara says it.
See also: another, tomorrow

here today, gone tomorrow

soon over or forgotten; short-lived or transient.
1996 Sunday Telegraph Apparently when people spend their money on things that are here today gone tomorrow, like flowers, food and Champagne, it tells you more about the state of the economy than when they buy solid things.
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

jam tomorrow

a pleasant thing which is often promised but rarely materializes. British
This expression comes from Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass ( 1871 ): ‘The rule is jam tomorrow and jam yesterday—but never jam today’.
See also: jam, tomorrow

as if there was (or as though there were) no tomorrow

with no regard for the future consequences.
1980 Guardian Weekly Oil supplies that Americans at home continue to consume as though there were no tomorrow.
See also: if, no, there, tomorrow

tomorrow is another day

the future will bring fresh opportunities.
This phrase was in use as long ago as the early 16th century, in the form tomorrow is a new day .
See also: another, tomorrow

jam toˈmorrow

(British English, informal) good things that are promised for the future but never happen: They refused to settle for a promise of jam tomorrow.This comes from Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass (1871) in which the Queen says to Alice ‘The rule is, jam tomorrow and jam yesterday but never jam today.’
See also: jam, tomorrow

here toˌday, gone toˈmorrow

if something is here today, gone tomorrow, it only exists or stays for a short time: The restaurant staff don’t tend to stay for very long — they’re here today, gone tomorrow. OPPOSITE: be here to stay
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

do something as if/like there’s no toˈmorrow

(informal) do something with a lot of energy, as if this is the last time you will be able to do it: She’s spending money like there’s no tomorrow.
See also: if, like, no, something, tomorrow

a ˌweek toˈmorrow, on ˈMonday, etc.

(British English) (also a ˌweek from toˈmorrow, ˈMonday, etc. American English, British English ) seven days after the day that you mention: It’s my birthday a week on Tuesday.
See also: on, week

put off

v.
1. To delay or postpone something: I always put off paying the bills and end up paying a late fee. If you keep putting your homework off, you won't get it done.
2. To persuade someone or something to postpone an activity: I managed to put off the creditors for another week. We succeeded in putting the meeting off until next week.
3. To cause someone to be offended, disgusted, and repelled: His indifferent attitude has put us off. Her arrogance put off the interviewers.
4. To discourage someone from doing something: The bad weather put us off from trying to climb the mountain.
5. To cause someone to be distracted from something and perform poorly: That athlete is sensitive, and too much crowd noise puts off his game. She throws the ball pretty well, but the pain in her arm put her aim off.
See also: off, put

like there was no tomorrow

mod. as if there would never be another opportunity. She was drinking booze like there was no tomorrow.
See also: like, no, there, tomorrow

here today and gone tomorrow

Describing an ephemeral phenomenon, a passing fancy, a fad. Originally this expression referred to the relatively brief span of a human life. It was recorded by numerous writers and was included in James Kelly’s Scottish Proverbs of 1721. By the nineteenth century it had become a less serious thought. T. C. Haliburton (Sam Slick) included it in Wise Saws (1843): “I am a bird of passage—here today and gone tomorrow.”
See also: and, gone, here, today, tomorrow

tomorrow is another day

You’ve done enough for one day so leave the rest until tomorrow; also, you may have lost today but you may win the next time. The first meaning, similar to Rome was not built in a day, dates at least from the sixteenth century, when it was sometimes put as tomorrow is a new day (by Lyly and others; quoted by Jonathan Swift in 1738). The exact current wording dates from the early nineteenth century, and the second meaning of that same expression from the early twentieth century. “Tomorrow’s another day,” wrote Paul Green (The Field God, 1927), and less ambiguously, Barbara Pym in A Few Green Leaves (1980), “He would probably have . . . missed his opportunity. Still, tomorrow was another day.” In the motion picture Gone With the Wind (1939), Scarlett O’Hara’s concluding line, after losing Tara and Rhett Butler, is, “After all, tomorrow is another day.”
See also: another, tomorrow
References in periodicals archive ?
EVENTS INTO THE SPOTLIGHT Today and tomorrow at 7pm at Aberdeen Arts Centre, King Street, Aberdeen.
Met Office bosses said: "Southwesterly winds will strengthen through tomorrow. Gales will become widespread later on tomorrow, persisting well into Saturday while becoming more westerly.
Food and Drink Tomorrow and Sunday, 10am-6pm (8pm finish for Tomorrow food court).
by New Taipei City that it would close offices and schools tomorrow, Liu said he "respected their decision," reported CNA.
Merrells, who is also known for his roles in Syfy's "Dominion," CW's "The Tomorrow People" and British soap opera "Family Affairs," is the latest addition to the growing list of newcomers to Season 3 of "Legends of Tomorrow." Other previously announced new cast members include Tala Ashe ("American Odyssey") as Muslim hacktivist Zari Adrianna Tomaz, Billy Zane ("Titanic") as iconic showman P.T.
Donations can be made to Feed Tomorrow at www.gofundme.com/feedtomorrow or www.feedtomorrow.org/donate.html.
Tomorrow's action at snowbound Huntingdon is expected to fall to an 8am check today, however, while Friday's National Hunt card at Kempton will be replaced by an all-weather Flat meeting if it fails an inspection at 8am tomorrow.
PENARTH | The Three Jackets is an exhibition of artwork inspired by the film Abandoned Brothers, at Penarth Pier Pavilion from tomorrow until November 11.
St Paul's Church, Stockingford: Historic display, tomorrow 10am-4pm.
Inspection at 8am due to uncertainty of levels TOMORROW Fontwell Heavy, soft in places, waterlogged in places.
Details 01352 840758, ngs.org.uk 5 Rhos Orpheus Male Choir, Chester Cathedral, tomorrow, 7pm The choir appear with A Handbag of Harmonies Choir, The Band of the Cheshire Constabulary and Andrew Coleman in a concert marking the British Heart Foundation's 50th birthday.
Delays are expected overnight on the A66(M) at Blackwell, near Darlington, until tomorrow because of survey works.
A Better Tomorrow (Murrieta,,CA) is the first drug and alcohol treatment center in the nation to offer its patients HAVEOS, a DNA-customized program for individuals with a genetic predisposition for addictive behavior.
As part of its ongoing conservation and preservation efforts, Federal Premium presented Ducks Unlimited (DU) with a check from the Ultra-Shok Grasslands for Tomorrow royalty program.
'Girl Playing with a Peacock': He left me saying he would return tomorrow./I covered the floor of my home/Writing repeatedly 'tomorrow'./When dawn returned, they all enquired:/Tell us, friend,/When will your tomorrow come?/tomorrow, tomorrow, I lost all hopes./My beloved never returned./Says Vidyapati: Listen, beautiful one,/Other women lured him away.