toll

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Related to tolls: Toll roads, Ez pass

ask not for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for (someone or something)

Someone or something, especially a business, enterprise, organization, etc., is facing impending or imminent ruin or failure. It comes from a paraphrase of a quote from the poet John Donne, which in full reads, "And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee." As the Internet and digital media continue to grow in size and dominance, ask not for whom the bell tolls—it tolls for print-based businesses around the world. More and more evidence has been unearthed regarding the senator's involvement in the embezzlement scandal. Ask not for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for him.
See also: ask, bell, not, toll, whom

death toll

The number of deaths that have occurred after some major deadly event, such as an accident, act of violence, or natural disaster. The death toll of the conflict between the two countries is well over 2,000 people as of this morning.
See also: death, toll

take a toll (on someone or something)

To cause damage or deleterious effects gradually or through constant action or use. The inclement weather in these parts really takes a toll on the exteriors of the buildings. She just doesn't have her usual quickness. It seems like the long season has taken a toll. Years of smoking and drinking has taken a toll on her health.
See also: someone, take, toll

take a/its toll

To have a cumulative negative effect on someone or something. Based on all this water damage, it seems that leak really took a toll on our ceiling tiles. All those late nights working on my term paper really took a toll on me—I need about 24 hours' sleep to recover.
See also: take, toll

the bell tolls for (someone or something)

The end, failure, or ruin of someone or something is imminent. An allusion to the sound of a bell ringing from a church to indicate that someone has died. With the passing of this historic legislation, the bell tolls for these massive corporations who abuse the tax system to their own advantage. As the Internet and digital media continue to grow in size and dominance, the bell has begun to toll for print-based businesses around the world. It think it is now clear that the bell tolls for the senators who have been caught up in the embezzlement scandal.
See also: bell, toll

toll for (someone or something)

1. Of a church bell, to ring out in commemoration of someone or something. The bells of churches across the nation are tolling for the anniversary of the country's liberation from the empire. During the war, there wasn't a day that went by without the bells tolling for some poor soul who had been killed.
2. To signal the imminent end, failure, or ruin of someone or something. With the passing of this historic legislation, the bell tolls for these massive corporations who abuse the tax system to their own advantage. As the Internet and digital media continue to grow in size and dominance, the bell has begun to toll for print-based businesses around the world. It think it is now clear that the bell tolls for the senators who have been caught up in the embezzlement scandal.
See also: toll

toll the death knell

To cause or signal the impending end or ruin of something, especially a business, organization, or activity. Refers to the sound of a bell ringing (the knell) from a church to indicate that someone has died. The geometric expansion of the Internet and digital media has tolled the death knell for countless print-based businesses around the world.
See also: death, knell, toll

take (quite) a toll (on someone or something)

to cause damage or wear by using something or by hard living. Years of sunbathing took a toll on Mary's skin. Drug abuse takes quite a toll on the lives of people.
See also: take, toll

toll for someone

[for a bell] to ring for someone. Who are the bells tolling for? The bells are tolling for Mr. Green, who died last night.
See also: toll

take its toll

Be damaging or harmful, cause loss or destruction, as in The civil war has taken its toll on both sides, or The heavy truck traffic has taken its toll on the highways. This expression transfers the taking of toll, a tribute or tax, to exacting other costs. [Late 1800s]
See also: take, toll

take its toll

If a problem or a difficult situation takes its toll, it causes unpleasant effects. The bad weather was soon taking its toll on most of the crew members. The separation from Harry was beginning to take its toll.
See also: take, toll

take its ˈtoll (on somebody/something)

(also take a (heavy) ˈtoll (of something)) have a bad effect on somebody/something; cause a lot of damage, deaths, suffering, etc: The present economic crisis is taking a heavy toll. Thousands of firms have gone bankrupt.His job is taking its toll on him. He needs a rest.
See also: take, toll
References in periodicals archive ?
A spokesman for SRC said: "SRC amends the tolls at the start of each year in strict compliance with the Severn Bridges Act 1992.
The IBA is now preparing to install temporary toll booths, which will be located just north of the current booths and accessed by the recently completed temporary toll lanes.
ATFI is a rapidly-growing organization united by the belief that a viable, sustainable solution to America's transportation needs must not include putting new tolls on existing interstates.
Merseytravel is recommending a 10p increase for car journeys from PS1.60 to PS1.70 when members meet to decide the toll on Thursday.
While Brian Higgins has recently said the New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA) should waive the 15-cent toll at the Williamsville toll barrier, he did not apparently mention the possible removal of the Grand Island toll booth.
The project, which would speed up toll collection and eliminate toll plaza traffic congestion, is expected to pay for itself over several years through savings from elimination of 400 toll collector jobs.
But the road is losing money and toll road owners Midland Expressway Ltd (MEL) made a loss of PS41million in 2011.
The report warned that the M6 Toll had lost money, even though "roadworks that commenced on a competing section of the free M6 Motorway in April had a positive effect on traffic".
Even in the 1900s the toll bars of Middlesbrough were considered to be anachronistic and, more importantly, a major hindrance to the movement goods around the town as well as from beyond.
MARK DOWD, chairman of the Merseyside Passenger Transport Authority "replied" on Monday to the MTUA letter, which referred to David Cameron supporting the removal of toll on the Swinford bridge in his constituency.
The toll for standard cars using routes mainly running through the metropolitan area is 700 yen, but many users who travel only short distances have complained about having to pay a high fee for such a short distance, calling for a change in the system.
Soon we learned that plans for new toll road construction, conversion of existing roads to toll roads, property confiscation for land acquisition, awarding of building contracts to a foreign consortium, shady campaign contributions, and passage of the largest spending bill in Texas history had slipped past Texas voters unnoticed.
It links four other electronic toll highways that traverse the city with the aim of reducing Santiago's notorious traffic.
Former councillor Stan Smith says tolls are "just another tax on the motorist" and hopes the site will attract thousands of supporters.
"There will always be some federal funding shortfall for transportation; to cover that shortfall, tolls will be one of the tools states will consider," said HNTB senior vice president and national toll expert Jack Finn.