toll

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Related to tolling: Tolling agreement

ask not for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for (someone or something)

Someone or something, especially a business, enterprise, organization, etc., is facing impending or imminent ruin or failure. It comes from a paraphrase of a quote from the poet John Donne, which in full reads, "And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee." As the Internet and digital media continue to grow in size and dominance, ask not for whom the bell tolls—it tolls for print-based businesses around the world. More and more evidence has been unearthed regarding the senator's involvement in the embezzlement scandal. Ask not for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for him.
See also: ask, bell, not, toll, whom

death toll

The number of deaths that have occurred after some major deadly event, such as an accident, act of violence, or natural disaster. The death toll of the conflict between the two countries is well over 2,000 people as of this morning.
See also: death, toll

take a toll (on someone or something)

To cause damage or deleterious effects gradually or through constant action or use. The inclement weather in these parts really takes a toll on the exteriors of the buildings. She just doesn't have her usual quickness. It seems like the long season has taken a toll. Years of smoking and drinking has taken a toll on her health.
See also: someone, take, toll

take a/its toll

To have a cumulative negative effect on someone or something. Based on all this water damage, it seems that leak really took a toll on our ceiling tiles. All those late nights working on my term paper really took a toll on me—I need about 24 hours' sleep to recover.
See also: take, toll

the bell tolls for (someone or something)

The end, failure, or ruin of someone or something is imminent. An allusion to the sound of a bell ringing from a church to indicate that someone has died. With the passing of this historic legislation, the bell tolls for these massive corporations who abuse the tax system to their own advantage. As the Internet and digital media continue to grow in size and dominance, the bell has begun to toll for print-based businesses around the world. It think it is now clear that the bell tolls for the senators who have been caught up in the embezzlement scandal.
See also: bell, toll

toll for (someone or something)

1. Of a church bell, to ring out in commemoration of someone or something. The bells of churches across the nation are tolling for the anniversary of the country's liberation from the empire. During the war, there wasn't a day that went by without the bells tolling for some poor soul who had been killed.
2. To signal the imminent end, failure, or ruin of someone or something. With the passing of this historic legislation, the bell tolls for these massive corporations who abuse the tax system to their own advantage. As the Internet and digital media continue to grow in size and dominance, the bell has begun to toll for print-based businesses around the world. It think it is now clear that the bell tolls for the senators who have been caught up in the embezzlement scandal.
See also: toll

toll the death knell

To cause or signal the impending end or ruin of something, especially a business, organization, or activity. Refers to the sound of a bell ringing (the knell) from a church to indicate that someone has died. The geometric expansion of the Internet and digital media has tolled the death knell for countless print-based businesses around the world.
See also: death, knell, toll

take (quite) a toll (on someone or something)

to cause damage or wear by using something or by hard living. Years of sunbathing took a toll on Mary's skin. Drug abuse takes quite a toll on the lives of people.
See also: take, toll

toll for someone

[for a bell] to ring for someone. Who are the bells tolling for? The bells are tolling for Mr. Green, who died last night.
See also: toll

take its toll

Be damaging or harmful, cause loss or destruction, as in The civil war has taken its toll on both sides, or The heavy truck traffic has taken its toll on the highways. This expression transfers the taking of toll, a tribute or tax, to exacting other costs. [Late 1800s]
See also: take, toll

take its toll

If a problem or a difficult situation takes its toll, it causes unpleasant effects. The bad weather was soon taking its toll on most of the crew members. The separation from Harry was beginning to take its toll.
See also: take, toll

take its ˈtoll (on somebody/something)

(also take a (heavy) ˈtoll (of something)) have a bad effect on somebody/something; cause a lot of damage, deaths, suffering, etc: The present economic crisis is taking a heavy toll. Thousands of firms have gone bankrupt.His job is taking its toll on him. He needs a rest.
See also: take, toll
References in periodicals archive ?
The cashless tolling system will debit travelers' E-ZPass accounts as they drive under the overhead gantry at regular roadway speeds.
Tolling existing interstates would reverse this progress, raising costs for travelers, businesses, and consumers, and harming the many businesses and communities located along interstate routes subject to new tolls."
Tolling technology is now being tapped for more than just toll collection.
However, logically, a taxpayer will seek out a tax adviser to claim a refund due to tolling after the disability has ended; thus, there would be no question as to the duration of the disability.
The road transport and highways ministry is planning to test a new tolling system, being called ' shadow tolling', where the government will pay toll tax to the contractor based on the number of commuters using a particular highway.
Department of Veteran Affairs, 498 US 89 (1990) (a nontax case), in which the Supreme Court found an untimely lawsuit filed against a government employer under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to be timely based on the "rule of equitable tolling," which applies "to suits against the Government, in the same way that is applicable" to Title VII suits against private employers.
But the head of the local tolling authority says the issue hasn't resulted in significant lost revenue for existing toll roads.
The South East Wales Transport Alliance (Sewta) - representing 10 local authorities - says the tolling period should be extended to fund the new M4.
Together, the measures choke off state funding for toll projects, and could encourage planners to avoid tolling on highway expansions.
'The last thing we wanted was for the Government to announce, as it did recently, a further extension of tolling.