tell of (something)

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tell of (something)

To relate information about something (to someone). A noun or pronoun can be used between "tell" and "of" to specify whom the speaker is telling. The book tells of catastrophic events that befell the earth thousands of years ago. She has been telling us of her research into new treatments for degenerative neurological disorders.
See also: of, tell

tell of someone or something

to speak of someone or something. The messenger told of great destruction, hunger, and disease in the northern part of the country. I want you to tell of Jane and how she is doing.
See also: of, tell
References in classic literature ?
They told of terrible combats with men or with fierce strange beasts, they told of passion, of revenge.
They were no longer all of war, of revenge; they told of love also.
As it happened, however, the New York doctor did not come "to-morrow." At the last moment a telegram told of an unavoidable delay owing to the sudden illness of the specialist himself.
Another article, in the Christian Science Monitor for March 17, told of a student group from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, who also spent spring break living amidst rather primitive conditions (outdoor toilets and showers) while helping to rebuild New Orleans.
Dawson told of a recent phone call she had received from him as he was sitting poolside on a "rest and relaxation" break.
Cornelia Funke's INKSPELL (0439554004, $19.99) continues the saga begun in her popular INKHEART, which told of a book's characters which sprang to life and changed one Meggie's world forever.
Pope John Paul II, now appearing Nitely in Eternity, told of the evils of gay marriage but not the evils of horny priests.
In that regard, one day, I saw a little article in the newspaper that told of a three-star general from Washington being dispatched to a small town in the segregated South to present to the mother of an African American soldier who had been killed in war, his posthumous award for his bravery.
Into the box he went, told of every oat sown (it took a while) and came out with a burning red face and a penance of three complete rosaries.
Everyone is asking why the top NASA officials who decided to launch the fatal Challenger flight had not been told of the concerns of people down below, like Allan McDonald and the other worried engineers at Morton Thiokol.