to wit


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to wit

That is; more precisely; namely. Often used in technical or formal writing. The officer testified to having found several grams of a Class B narcotic, to wit, cocaine, on the defendant's person at the time of arrest. The plot is absolutely absurd, such as it is—to wit, an axe-wielding murderer teams up with a cyborg cop to stop an alien invasion.
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to wit

namely; that is; that is to say. The criminal was punished; to wit, he received a 20-year sentence. Many students, to wit Mary, Bill, Sue, and Anne, complained about their teacher.
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to wit

That is to say, namely, as in There are three good reasons for not going, to wit, we don't want to, we don't have to, and we can't get a reservation . This expression comes from the now archaic verb to wit, meaning "know or be aware of," not heard except in this usage. [Late 1500s]
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to ˈwit

(old-fashioned, formal) used when you are about to be more exact about something you have just referred to: I told him I only spoke one foreign language, to wit French.
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to wit

That is to say; namely.
See also: wit