to windward


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to to windward: Windward Islands

to windward of (something)

obsolete To or into a more advantageous position in respect of something or some situation. An allusion to sailing (in which it is still used literally), in which it is most advantageous to be on or toward the side from which the wind is blowing. The company's many lawyers have ensured that it remains to windward of the new tax laws.
See also: of, windward

to windward

Toward an advantageous position, as in We were hoping to get to windward of the situation. This expression transfers the nautical meaning of the phrase, "move in the direction from which the wind blows," to other kinds of undertaking. Its figurative use dates from the late 1700s.
See also: windward

to windward

Into or to an advantageous posture or position.
See also: windward
References in classic literature ?
"Suppose it took you six times that long to return to windward; that would bring you back by the end of a week."
Prior to Windward, he was a vice president in the Wealth Management division of Goldman Sachs & Co (NYSE: GS) where he worked with corporate executives and high net worth families.
Earlier, he went to Windward Mall in Kaneohe to see a 3D version of the movie Avatar with his daughters and family friends.
At a port rounding, if a port tack boat thinks she has room to tack in front of an approaching starboard boat then she surely has enough room to sail across her and tack to windward and avoid risking a breach of RRS 18.3.
The wind was light to medium throughout and the starts were close, but Twisted Skippers squeaked ahead in both races after a post-start pinching match to windward.
As a child author Elsie Hulsizer spent her summers sailing in a small sailboat with hr parents, and as an adult she and her husband spent their summers sailing out of Puget Sound and up the straight of Juan de Fuca--also to windward, where they explored the west coast of Vancouver Island over a twenty-year period.
As a child author Elsie Hulsizer spent her summers sailing in a small sailboat with hr parents, and as an adult she and her husband spent their sumemrs sailing out of Puget Sound and up the straight of Juan de Fuca--also to windward, where they explored the west coast of Vancouver Island over a twenty-year period.
It was October 1998, the middle of the hurricane season in the Caribbean, and he had learned of a large and erratic cyclone roiling up to windward. The hurricane--Tropical Storm Mitch--was, in fact, rapidly building into a Category 5 storm, and was destined to become one of the most destructive on record.