to think (that)

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to think (that)

It is really shocking or surprising that (something is the case). And to think, if I had taken the but to work like I normally do, I would have been in that accident, too! To think that a woman like could be elected to public office.
See also: think

to ˈthink (that)...

used to show that you are surprised or shocked by something: I can still hardly believe it! To think that the President stayed at my hotel!To think that he was killed on the last day of the war. It’s so sad.
References in classic literature ?
It is supposed that thoughts cannot just come and go, but need a person to think them.
No doubt they are prompted to this view, in the first place, by bias, namely, by the desire to think that they can know of the existence of a world outside themselves.
I have to think a little, sometimes, to know what I did say, or what I do think.
As if it were any pleasure to me to think ill of you," said Mary, in a mournful tone.
It makes me a little frightened to think of all that may happen in them," said Cecily.
She tried to think of something else and to pray, but could do neither.
The truth is, I begun to think uncomfortably of the dedication.
I'm not going to think about it at all until I know whether I can go or not," said Anne resolutely.
Then can you bear to think of me as your lover, Maggie?
He began to think of Misselthwaite and wonder if he should not go home.
They are already sufficiently detached from religion to think of their beauty, to take care of it, to correct without relaxation their parure of statues or arabesques.
At home, looking after her children, she had no time to think.
It makes me feel so bad to think you could let me go to Sereny Harper and make such a fool of myself and never say a word.
You must not dare to think of such a horrible thing
You're no longer a boy, you know; you must begin to think of settling down.