to thine own self be true

to thine own self be true

Act authentically, in accordance with your interests, beliefs, and desires. This set phrase comes from Shakespeare's Hamlet. You don't have to be a cheerleader if you don't want to, regardless of what the popular kids say. To thine own self be true!
See also: own, true
References in periodicals archive ?
William Shakespeare in Hamlet says, 'This above all: to thine own self be true.' You make a choice and you answer for the consequences of your choice.
My English teacher once quoted Shakespeare to me and said: "To thine own self be true".
"Today for me is a celebration of something that my dad taught me and that is -- to thine own self be true," she said.
It is with this recognition of our shared humanity that we are able to establish a genuine community of solidarity; a community that we can call sacred space where we are free to be authentic because we have the freedom to choose to be so, 'to thine own self be true,' and to choose to be more, our call to be magnanimous in love and service.
The post To thine own self be true, and go to the screening appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
He responds to Hamlet's injunction "to thine own self be true" by positing that being ourselves is necessary in order to understand ourselves, which in turn in necessary in order to be true to ourselves.
Peterson will speak on the topic "To Thine Own Self Be True" as part of encouraging the development of self-awareness to create "a life worth living." Admission is free.
Like Shakespeare said, "To thine own self be true."
In other words, the ability to follow the words of William Shakespeare: "to thine own self be true," said Amy Brunell, lead author of the study and assistant professor of psychology at Ohio State University's Newark campus.
Polonius concludes with this familiar adage, "This above all: to thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man."
Today, Wikipedia says Polonius is "best known for uttering the immortal words, To thine own self be true.'" (Tomorrow, of course, Wikipedia could say something else entirely.) But Polonius will still be next to Aesop and Poor Richard's Almanac as the most often quoted pronouncer of platitudes.
The display will be in keeping with the theme of the 2009 parade, "Come out and play" and will feature Shakespeare's famous quote: "This above all: to thine own self be true."
It's a less graceful form of To thine own self be true. Sloganized maybe not, but I think I was epiphanized!
Judy Clemens' TO THINE OWN SELF BE TRUE (1590582985, $24.95) provides a Stella Crown mystery set in Pennsylvania, where a holiday trip to her tattoo artist leaves him dead.
It pushed To Thine Own Self Be True into second place and All Journeys Begin With A First Step into third.