take root, to

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take root

1. Of a plant, to develop and spread roots so as to begin thriving. If you allow the weeds to take root, they'll be very difficult to remove. Once the trees take root, they should be self-sufficient.
2. By extension, to become firmly fixed or established. A push to legalize marijuana is taking root across the state. The senator had many revolutionary ideas that just never took root among the general public.
See also: root, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take root

 
1. Lit. [for a plant] to develop roots in soil or some other growing medium. The new plants should take root in a few weeks and start growing.
2. Fig. to begin to take hold or have effect. Things will begin to change when my new policies take root. My ideas began to take root and influence other people.
See also: root, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take root

Become established or fixed, as in We're not sure how the movement took root, but it did so very rapidly. This idiom transfers the establishment of a plant, whose roots settle into the earth, to other matters. [Late 1500s]
See also: root, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take root

COMMON If an idea or belief takes root, it becomes established or begins to develop. That was when the idea of starting up his own picture library began to take root. Green politics have taken firm root in Alsace, where the Green Party have a chance of gaining two seats.
See also: root, take
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

take root

become fixed or established.
See also: root, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take ˈroot

become firmly established: His ideas on education never really took root; they were just too extreme.
If a plant takes root it develops roots and attaches itself to the ground.
See also: root, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take root

1. To become established or fixed.
2. To become rooted.
See also: root, take
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take root, to

To become firmly established. Likening the establishment of an idea, program, or similar abstraction to a botanical rooting is very old indeed. It appears in the Bible, where the psalmist says God has brought a vine (i.e., the Jewish people) out of Egypt and planted it, “and didst cause it to take deep root, and it filled the land” (Psalm 80:9). Leon Trotsky allegedly said, “We only die when we fail to take root in others” (quoted in Trevor Griffiths’ play, The Party).
See also: take
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
GM's product pipeline looks relatively strong, with a number of key products slated to take root in new segments, including the family of midsize CUVs--Saturn Outlook, GMC Acadia and Buick Enclave--and the resurgence of Saturn.