sweat blood, to

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sweat blood

1. To work very intensely and diligently; to expend all of one's energy or effort doing something. We sweated blood for six months straight, but we finally got our product finished and on store shelves. My mother and father sweated blood to provide for me and all my siblings.
2. To suffer intense distress, anxiety, worry, or fear. My passport had expired just before the trip, so I was sweating blood as we went over the border into Canada. Some of these kids sweat blood every time we have to give them a test.
See also: blood, sweat
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

sweat blood

 and sweat bullets
Fig. to be very anxious and tense. What a terrible test! I was really sweating blood at the last. Bob is such a bad driver. I sweat bullets every time I ride with him.
See also: blood, sweat
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sweat blood

1. Also, sweat one's guts out. Work diligently or strenuously, as in The men were sweating blood to finish the roof before the storm hit. The phrase using guts was first used about 1890, and that with blood shortly thereafter.
2. Suffer mental anguish, worry intensely, as in Waiting for the test results, I was sweating blood. This usage was first recorded in a work by D.H. Lawrence in 1924. Both usages are colloquial, and allude to the agony of Jesus in Gethsemane (Luke 22:44): "And being in an agony he prayed more earnestly: and his sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground."
See also: blood, sweat
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sweat blood

INFORMAL
If you sweat blood, you work very hard to achieve something. I've been sweating blood over this report. I sweat blood to write songs with tunes that you can remember.
See also: blood, sweat
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

sweat blood

1 make an extraordinarily strenuous effort to do something. 2 be extremely anxious. informal
See also: blood, sweat
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

sweat ˈblood

(informal)
1 work very hard; make a very great effort: I sweated blood to get that essay finished on time.
2 be very worried or afraid: He sweats blood every time the telephone rings, in case it’s the police.
See also: blood, sweat
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

sweat blood

tv. to work very hard at something; to endure distress in the process of accomplishing something. (see also piss blood.) And here I sweated blood to put you through college, and you treat me like a stranger.
See also: blood, sweat
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

sweat blood

Informal
1. To work diligently or strenuously.
2. To worry intensely.
See also: blood, sweat
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sweat blood, to

To exert oneself to the utmost; also, to experience extreme worry or fright. Both usages of this slangy expression date from the late 1800s. Earlier, to sweat blood also could mean to spend money; John Dryden, among others, used it in this way in the 1600s, but this usage is obsolete. The modern meanings appear in G. S. Porter’s Harvester (1911), “He just sweat blood to pacify her, but her couldn’t make it,” and in D. H. Lawrence’s Memoirs of the Foreign Legion (1924), “I sweat blood any time somebody comes through the door.” A synonym for sweat blood in the sense of “working hard” is to sweat one’s guts out, which George Orwell used in The Road to Wigan Pier (1937): “It makes one sick to see half a dozen men sweating their guts out to a dig a trench.” A synonym for experiencing fright or anxiety is to sweat bullets, alluding to drops of sweat the size of bullets. This hyperbole dates from the mid-1900s.
See also: sweat
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to (https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/hematidrosis-hematohidrosis#2) WebMD , hematidrosis is a rare condition that causes the body to sweat blood and often occurs in people who are suffering extreme stress.
"They just want people to sweat blood for the black-and-white shirt."
"It's because they choose some matches to sweat blood and in other matches they don't.
Where is the grit, determination and readiness to sweat blood among our players?
BELGIUM............................................0 ENGLAND..........................................1 by Steve Bates JOLEON LESCOTT shows he is willing to sweat blood for Queen and Country on Diamond Jubilee weekend.
For thirteen years he has pulled on that red shirt and been prepared to sweat blood for it every time.
Malouda finished the season at Stamford Bridge in great form with seven goals in his last 13 matches, and at least he looks as though he's willing to sweat blood for the cause - unlike one or two of his more illustrious (and shorter-priced) team-mates.
That's why fans have every right to expect every player to sweat blood for Boro in every game.
Aberdeen finished sixth last year after a late charge to make the top half before the split but Calderwood has warned his side must do better and they are set to sweat blood to achieve his aims.
You have got to prove to Newcastle fans you want to play and you want to sweat blood for them, and Dyer seems to be doing that
BAYER LEVERKUSEN star Roque Junior has warned Liverpool they will have to sweat blood to score against his side in the Champions League.
I expect," he concludes, "that those Jesuits who pushed for this statement had to sweat blood, and will receive their well-earned service medals in the world to come."
And, faced with the knowledge of his approaching demise, it is conceivable Jesus's emotional state caused him to sweat blood.