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sign on the dotted line

To give one's formal agreement or assent by signing a legally binding contract document. We've approved you for a $10,000 loan. You just need to sign on the dotted line, and we'll transfer the funds to your account. Be sure to read all the fine print before you sign on the dotted line.
See also: dot, line, on, sign
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

sign on the dotted line

 
1. Lit. to indicate one's agreement or assent by placing one's signature on a special line provided for that purpose. (The line may be solid or dotted.) I agreed to the contract, but I haven't signed on the dotted line yet. When you have signed on the dotted line, please give me a call.
2. Fig. to indicate one's agreement to something. Okay. I agree to your terms. I'll sign on the dotted line. He is thinking favorably about going with us to Canada, but he hasn't signed on the bottom line.
See also: dot, line, on, sign
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sign on the dotted line

Agree formally or fully, as in The deal is just about fixed; all they have to do is sign on the dotted line. This idiom refers to the broken line traditionally appearing at the bottom of a legal document, indicating the place for one's signature. [Early 1900s]
See also: dot, line, on, sign
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sign on the dotted line

COMMON If you sign on the dotted line, you formally agree to something by signing an official document. Once you sign on the dotted line you are committed to that property. Note: You can also say that someone signs on the line. He signed on the line and can only blame himself. Note: You can also talk about someone's name on the dotted line or signature on the dotted line. He went to see Malcolm's widow, Betty, too; he needed her name on the dotted line.
See also: dot, line, on, sign
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

sign on the dotted line

agree formally.
1921 P. G. Wodehouse Indiscretions of Archie I spoke to him as one old friend to another…and he sang a few bars from ‘Rigoletto’, and signed on the dotted line.
See also: dot, line, on, sign
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

sign on the dotted ˈline

(informal) sign your name at the bottom of a contract and so agree to a deal, etc: The job isn’t mine until I’ve signed on the dotted line.
See also: dot, line, on, sign
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

sign on the dotted line, to

To indicate one’s full acceptance of terms being offered. The dotted line in question is often used on official documents to indicate the place for one’s signature. The term dates from the early 1900s. P. G. Wodehouse used it in Indiscretions of Archie, (1921): “He sang a few bars from ‘Rigoletto,’ and signed on the dotted line.”
See also: dot, on, sign
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
And the "a hell-a-lotta money was involved" to get Lady Jay Dee to sign on the dotted line.
If the United States wants a done deal by 2005, it will have to persuade the FTAA's largest partner to sign on the dotted line.
The government, however, has been loath to sign on the dotted line for fear of locking in politically unpopular price increases and implicitly adding to its debt responsibilities by providing a sovereign guarantee on financing.