to save (one's) life

(redirected from to save her life)

to save (one's) life

Regardless of one's effort, passion, or desire. Ugh, this art assignment is so annoying—I can't draw an apple to save my life. Rachel is so selfish! It's like she couldn't consider another person's feelings to save her life.
See also: life, save

to save one's life

Even if one's life depended on it, as in I couldn't eat another bite to save my life, or Betty wouldn't climb a mountain to save her life. This hyperbolic expression nearly always follows a negative statement that one wouldn't or couldn't do something. Anthony Trollope used a slightly different wording in The Kellys and the O'Kellys (1848): "I shan't remain long, if it was to save my life and theirs; I can't get up small talk for the rector and his curate."
See also: life, save

to save your life

used in various expressions, especially can't (or couldn't ) do something to save your life , to indicate that the person in question is very incompetent at doing something.
The first recorded use of this expression is by Anthony Trollope in The Kellys and O'Kellys ( 1848 ): ‘If it was to save my life and theirs, I can't get up small talk for the rector and his curate’.
See also: life, save

to save (one's) life

No matter how hard one tries: He can't ski to save his life.
See also: life, save
References in periodicals archive ?
Doctors attending the lady at the hospital had advised her for immediate blood transfusion to save her life.
With no siblings, and her own three children only a half-match, she would have to rely on a stranger to save her life.
Stunning Scots model Johanna MacVicar last night begged for a bone marrow donor to save her life.
Fortunately for her, a Michigan woman with Irish and German ancestry provided the transplant in 1999 to save her life after Sun was diagnosed with aplastic anemia when she was 11.
Officials said Sun's Chinese-Caucasian heritage made it difficult to find a match, but it turned out a Michigan woman with Irish and German ancestry provided the transplant to save her life.
When doctors told Lynn Trahan in 1982 that the only way to save her life was to perform a mastectomy, she refused to make an appointment for the procedure.