run to seed, to

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go to seed

To look shabby, unhealthy, or unattractive due to a lack of care or attention. Wow, Tim's really started going to seed ever since he had kids. The house has gone to seed with those college kids living there.
See also: go, seed

run to seed

To look shabby, unhealthy, or unattractive due to a lack of care or attention. Wow, Tim's really started running to seed ever since he had kids. The house has run to seed with those college kids living there.
See also: run, seed
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go to seed

 
1. and run to seed Lit. [for a plant] to grow long enough to produce seed; [for a plant] to spend its energy going to seed. The lettuce went to seed and we couldn't eat it. Plants like that ought not to be allowed to go to seed.
2. and run to seed Fig. [for a lawn or a plant] to produce seeds because it has not had proper care. You've got to mow the grass. It's going to seed. Don't let the lawn go to seed. It looks so—seedy!
3. Fig. [for something] to decline in looks, status, or utility due to lack of care. (The same as run to seed.) This old coat is going to seed. Have to get a new one. The front of the house is going to seed. Let's get it painted.
See also: go, seed
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

run to seed

Also, go to seed. Become devitalized or worn out; deteriorate, as in I went back to visit my old elementary school, and sadly, it has really run to seed, or The gold medalist quickly went to seed after he left competition. This term alludes to plants that, when allowed to set seed after flowering, either taste bitter, as in the case of lettuce, or do not send out new buds, as is true of annual flowers. Its figurative use dates from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: run, seed
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

go to seed

or

run to seed

1. If someone goes to seed or runs to seed, they allow themselves to become fat, unhealthy and unattractive as they get older. He was big and fleshy, like an athlete gone to seed. Once he had carried a lot of muscle but now he was running to seed.
2. If a place goes to seed or runs to seed, it becomes dirty and untidy because people stop taking care of it. The report painted a depressing picture of an America going to seed, its bridges and roads falling apart, its national parks neglected. When she died, the house went to seed. Note: When vegetables such as lettuce go to seed, they produce flowers and seeds, and are no longer fit to eat.
See also: go, seed
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

go (or run) to seed

1 (of a plant) cease flowering as the seeds develop. 2 deteriorate in condition, strength, or efficiency.
See also: go, seed
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

run to seed, to

To become old and decrepit. Plants that are allowed to set seed after flowering either become bitter to the taste (lettuce) or will not bloom as well the following year (daffodils, tulips). Henry Fielding used the term figuratively in an essay of 1740: “For Virtue itself by growing too exuberant and . . . by running to seed changes its very nature.”
See also: run
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in classic literature ?
He and his Scotch wife and his Scotch children, the only respectable inhabitants of Queen's Crawley, were forced to migrate, with their goods and their chattels, and left the stately comfortable gardens to go to waste, and the flower-beds to run to seed. Poor Lady Crawley's rose-garden became the dreariest wilderness.
Lack of water or too much heat will cause the plants to run to seed. Improving the soil with organic material to enable it to hold on to moisture should help to stop this from happening next year.
Choose the variety Leisure, which is large-leaved and slow to run to seed.
Sow the seed indoors in late March in trays of compost, not earlier as the plants tend to run to seed.
Sow seeds indoors in late March in trays of compost, not earlier as the plants tend to run to seed.
Annuals must be regularly dead-headed and watered if they are not to run to seed quickly.
Allow annuals such as sunflowers, herbaceous plants such as coneflowers to run to seed.
Cultivars to search out include Tarzan, ideal for early and late sowings, French Breakfast, with its long root, Scarlet Globe and Cherry Belle with their round roots, Viola, with its purple skin and pure white flesh, Zlata with its yellow skin and Munchen Bier, with its large roots and, if it is allowed to run to seed, a harvest of edible spicy seed pods.
Take them out when they start to run to seed in early spring, when it's time to plant spring bedding.
Its only problem is that it tends to run to seed very quickly.
Hot weather causes pak choi to run to seed, so grow in a semi-shady position and keep them well watered.
Brown has one of the most comprehensive range of vegetables, and I like the sound of its exclusive pak choi Blizzard F1, which is British-bred and said to be slower to run to seed than many varieties.
Parsley will come up again in the second year but it won't do as well and tends to run to seed early.
Due to the lettuce's wild origins in poor, rocky and thin soils, it germinates and grows best in cooler climates and does not like very hot, dry conditions in which it tends to run to seed (bolting) very quickly.