ride roughshod over, to

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ride roughshod over (someone or something)

To treat someone or something with marked disdain, brutality, or contempt; to act without regard for the wellbeing of something or someone. In her ascent to the top of the political ladder, the senator rode roughshod over anyone who stood in her way. The new management team has ridden roughshod over the projects that we've been planning for months.
See also: over, ride, roughshod
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

ride roughshod over someone or something

 and run roughshod over someone or something
Fig. to treat someone or something with disdain or scorn. Tom seems to ride roughshod over his friends. You shouldn't have come into our town to ride roughshod over our laws and our traditions.
See also: over, ride, roughshod
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ride roughshod over

Act without regard for the feelings or interests of others, as in She just forges on, riding roughshod over her colleagues. This term alludes to the practice of arming horses with horseshoes mounted with projecting nails or points, which both gave them better traction and served as a weapon against fallen enemy soldiers. By 1800 it was being used figuratively for bullying behavior.
See also: over, ride, roughshod
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ride roughshod over

carry out your own plans or wishes with arrogant disregard for others.
1977 Times Literary Supplement Sociologists are notorious for their use of generalizing terms that ride roughshod over the particularities of history.
See also: over, ride, roughshod
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ride roughshod over

To treat with brutal force: a manager who rode roughshod over all opposition.
See also: over, ride, roughshod
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ride roughshod over, to

To act without consideration for another’s feelings or interests. The term comes from the seventeenth-century practice of arming cavalry horses with horseshoes mounted with projecting nails or points. This not only gave the horses better footing on slippery terrain but also served as a weapon against fallen enemy troops. Within the next hundred years or so the term was transferred to domineering behavior, overriding others without regard or respect. An 1861 issue of the Saturday Review stated, “We have ridden roughshod over neutrals in our time.”
See also: ride, roughshod, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
"These new proposals will allow developers to ride roughshod over local opinion.
"It is fairly typical of the way that he and some other people in the coalition have tried to ride roughshod over people's deeply-held views" - Lord Carey, former Archbishop of Canterbury, hits back at Mr Clegg.
Also yesterday, in contrast to what Cameron has said, a justice minister involved in the reform talks insisted there was no "great constitutional crisis about foreign judges trying to ride roughshod over British law".
[bar] SIR - It is a great shame indeed that the Vale of Glamorgan council cabinet have decided to ride roughshod over a schoolboy's winning entry to name the new Welsh-medium seed school in Barry, presumably for political reasons.
The senior management of this company seem determined to ride roughshod over their staff."
WHY has Royal Bank of Scotland chief executive Stephen Hester been allowed to ride roughshod over a Commons finance committee which had no backbone?
The weekend decision to ride roughshod over the Glens' pride and feelings has hammered another nail in the coffin lid of the competition.
They need intelligence if they are to act against determined hunting extremists, who think that they have the right not only to ride roughshod over the law but to be cruel to animal.
Another instance of their determination to ride roughshod over regional communities and their inhabitants is to be found in the conclusion of the Kate Barker reports on planning laws.
"However, any changes must not give a green light to supermarkets to ride roughshod over legitimate local concerns about large-scale developments."
It calls for nations to ride roughshod over their immigration laws, in order to move non-citizens into jobs.
It isn't fair that the selfish few -- louts, yobs and nuisance neighbours -- should be allowed to ride roughshod over everyone else.
It would seem that only some people have the financial clout and connections to ride roughshod over the laws of the land.
Forty-two have proven invasive enough to ride roughshod over native neighbors.