reinvent the wheel, to

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reinvent the wheel

To do something in a wholly and drastically new way, often unnecessarily. (Usually used in negative constructions.) The film doesn't reinvent the wheel for action films, but it adds enough clever twists on the genre to still feel fresh and new. The company is often criticized for trying to reinvent the wheel every time they bring a new product to market, adding gimmicks and innovations nobody wanted or asked for.
See also: reinvent, wheel
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

reinvent the wheel

Fig. to make unnecessary or redundant preparations. You don't need to reinvent the wheel. Read up on what others have done. I don't have to reinvent the wheel, but I will be cautious before I act.
See also: reinvent, wheel
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

reinvent the wheel

Do something again, from the beginning, especially in a needless or inefficient effort, as in School committees need not reinvent the wheel every time they try to improve the curriculum. This expression alludes to the invention of a simple but very important device that requires no improvement. [Second half of 1900s]
See also: reinvent, wheel
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

reinvent the wheel

If someone reinvents the wheel, they develop an idea or project that they consider new or different, when it is really no better than something that already exists. To avoid reinventing the wheel, it is important that managers are familiar with established research findings in this area. The problem is that they tend to reinvent the wheel each time they are called upon to respond to a new refugee emergency.
See also: reinvent, wheel
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

reinvent the wheel

waste a great deal of time or effort in creating something that already exists or doing something that has already been done.
See also: reinvent, wheel
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

reinvent the ˈwheel

waste time creating something that already exists and works well: There’s no point in us reinventing the wheel. Why can’t we just leave things as they are?
See also: reinvent, wheel
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

reinvent the wheel

tv. to make unnecessary or redundant preparations. You don’t need to reinvent the wheel. Read up on what others have done.
See also: reinvent, wheel
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

reinvent the wheel

To do or make something again, from the beginning, especially in a needless or inefficient effort.
See also: reinvent, wheel
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

reinvent the wheel, to

To belabor the obvious; to start again from the beginning when there is no need to. This Americanism dates from the second half of the twentieth century and most likely originated in business or industry. “‘The new compiler here is no different from the old one,’ said a Defense Department spokesman. ‘Let’s not reinvent the wheel’” (Boston Herald, 1984).
See also: reinvent
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
We didn't have to reinvent the wheel, we took our top three flavors that made us #1 plus a special variety of apple we had been saving just for the kids and we reimagined and redesigned the packaging."
There is no need to reinvent the wheel. It doesn't cost much to add FB friends or have a good crowd-drawing Instagram account.
"I'm comfortable in the role, but we aren't trying to reinvent the wheel. We are just trying to have more options in attack."
"I think for me as captain the one thing I've learned massively from Paulie and Brian before him is that you don't have to change anything, you don't have to reinvent the wheel.
X FACTOR seems to be getting desperate to reinvent the wheel. No longer can a well-known song be sung as its author intended.
Those wishing to organize a civic movement in Armenia must stop trying to reinvent the wheel. The civilized world
Preparing teachers for special education in the United States is a reflection that is not merely another attempt to reinvent the wheel. Rather, it is an investigation to learn from the past, use applications today in order to secure concrete and measurable goals in the diversified future of special education in America.
"I'm obviously going to have my own ideas, but we certainly aren't trying to reinvent the wheel."
We've got one day before the next game, he's not going to reinvent the wheel. He's got to keep trusting himself to play his way," the Sydney Morning Herald quoted Nielsen, as saying.
Referring to the stalled composite dialogue process, Basit said: "We already have an established framework and it would not be desirable to reinvent the wheel. " The spokesman made it clear that Pakistan was "not against engagement with India" but said "talks for the sake of talks would have no meaning.
In project management, there's the problem of whether or not to reinvent the wheel. Is it worthwhile to start over and make big changes, or is it better to reuse part or all of what works and move on from there?
It's too bad we have to reinvent the wheel every generation, instead of learning and moving forward together.
There is no attempt to reinvent the wheel. Instead, AC/DC have delivered exactly what those about to salute their rock idols would hope for, more of the same.
It is of course always the first to go when the new wet-behind-the-ears go-getting young senior manager turns up to reinvent the wheel. I should expect anyone in a hospice unlikely to live much longer to be given almost anything.