to oneself

to oneself

To the exclusion of anyone else. I have the house to myself this weekend, so I'm thinking of throwing a party. Now, that's private information, so just keep it to yourself.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

(all) to yourˈself, himˈself, etc.

for only you, him, etc. to have, use, etc: The boss was away last week so we had the office to ourselves.
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in classic literature ?
my dear comrades, it will be rather curious to have the earth for our moon, to see it rise on the horizon, to recognize the shape of its continents, and to say to oneself, `There is America, there is Europe;' then to follow it when it is about to lose itself in the sun's rays!
'Nothing ever seems so good as what one keeps to oneself,' said she, and was quite satisfied with her day's work.
Avoiding one's own experience is a way of avoiding paying attention to oneself. Experiential avoidance covers all the bases - thoughts, feelings, self-recognition in many forms, creating blind spots about oneself and others.
She explains what is really needed to be happy, illustrating the importance of loving the work; getting serious; being true to oneself; putting oneself first; having perspective, time, help, friends, and true grit; living within means to keep options open; taking credit; being the best lawyer possible; and thinking about career transitions.
(1) Neither wrote in particular about motivation; however, in different yet related ways, these two philosophers stressed the importance of relating to oneself, others and the world, and they gave a unique form to these acts of relating that lead one to be oneself.
The exquisite existential concept of being legally forbidden to be in touch with oneself, to hold oneself as a potential threat to oneself, to seek the protection of the state against oneself, seems more Stone's concern here than sending up the ham-fisted and incompetent trappings of bureaucracy.
Lawyer, grandmother, mediator and poet Janet Smith Warfield presents Shift: Change Your Words, Change Your World, a remarkable self-help guide to adapting one's consciousness to help bring peace to oneself and to the planet, one person at a time.
At first misfortune dogs their attempts, but with the help of Big Bou, each animal discovers their own special gifts and the importance of being themselves: "You already are part of our Caring Bou family and you just need to be you." The colorful illustrations blend beautiful natural scenery with just a touch of cartoon-like expression to soften the animals' faces in this wonderful picturebook with an important underlying message about being true to oneself and one's strengths.
With the story of the author's dog Bunny, a faithful companion with Addison's disease who nevertheless lived to be 15 years old and taught his owner numerous lessons, Paws of Wisdom reveals the importance of being consistent, humble, patient, true to oneself, and kind and gentle to all living things.
According to the theory, attributing cause to oneself will occur because the objectively self-aware person is experiencing him or herself as somehow different and exhibiting salient characteristics that distinguish them from the majority.
Triadic predicates: autoadjudicarse algo 'to award something to oneself', autoentregarse algo 'to give something to oneself', autorregalarse algo 'to give something as a present to oneself'
But "radical honesty"--in the sense intended here--is, by contrast, a matter of being truly open to what other people may have to say; especially those most different to oneself in temperament, cultural conditioning, or experience of life.
And no poet has written more glowingly of the joys of truthfulness to oneself and about oneself.
In her Autobiography, published in 1720 and immediately translated into several languages, Guyon used the genre "as a place of uncovering and covering, a place to negotiate conventions, a place where one tries to give to oneself and to the reader an acceptable image of oneself' (219).
To offer highly valued assistance to someone at minimal cost to oneself is not mandated by strict concern for rights and duties, but it is nonetheless morally indicated.