to name


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to (one's) name

In one's possession; owned by one. By the time I was out of college, the only things to my name were the clothes on my back and the broken-down old car I had bought in high school. When I stepped off the boat I didn't have a penny to my name, but the future ahead of me felt bright. They used to be so well off, but when the economy crashed and their business closed, it left them with very little to their name.
See also: name

to (one's) name

Belonging to one: I don't have a hat to my name.
See also: name
References in periodicals archive ?
Larry Ragan of The Ragan Report once observed, "If your goal is to establish a newsletter publishing empire, it probably isn't a good idea to name the first one after yourself and write it in your own inimitable style.
To name is also to claim dominion: naming children, slaves, domestic animals, or real estate is an announcement of figurative, if not literal, ownership of the named, as well as an indication of the namer's relationship to or sentiments about the named.
It also identifies a risk management problem when your camp is asked to name someone or some other organization as an Additional Insured.
Taxpayers were recorded in a variety of ways, including: Simao Fernandes Curado and his son-in-law; Maria Rodrigues, vendor, and her niece; the son-in-law of Baltasar Andre; A Loba and her husband; and Olaia Pinta and her sister, to name a few.
However, he remembers, "I could justify the etymology of the species name for relativitae by breaking it down to its Latin roots--`relating to life'." He decided in the early 1980s to name the species "in honor of life on Earth."
To name a textbox, right-click on it and select Form Field Properties.
The master Self determines its linguistic presence by using appropriate language to name itSelf.
To cope with the volume of clades and to bring some stability to names, Donoghue envisions that the PhyloCode will permit a scientist to name any clade that seems important.
It is shameful to name your child something superficial like a brand name.
If the participant fails to name a DB or names a beneficiary that does not qualify, the heirs must take distributions over the participant's remaining life expectancy.
This test typically shows that it takes people longer to name aloud the color of an ink used to print a word for a contrasting color (such as saying "green" in response to green ink making up the word "red") than to name the same color when it has been used to print a nonsense word.
Since 1965, Catholic parents have been almost four times more likely to name their daughters Jennifer than Mary."
When asked to name aloud the incompatible ink colors in which a list of color words is printed (for example, to say "blue" in response to the word "yellow" printed in blue ink, "red" in response to the word "green" printed in red ink, and so on), people experience a mental sensation comparable to running in a swimming pool - you just can't do it quickly.