jockey for position

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jockey for position

1. Literally, to move one's horse into a good or ideal position while racing. He's jockeying for position, but I don't think he'll finish higher than third.
2. To compete against others for a desirable role or thing. With the CEO retiring, everyone in management is jockeying for position The more outgoing kids started jockeying for position as soon as the class took the stage.
See also: for, jockey, position

jockeying for position

The act of competing against others for a desirable role or thing. This jockeying for position needs to stop—the CEO has already chosen his successor.
See also: for, jockey, position
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

jockey for position

 
1. Lit. to work one's horse into a desired position in a horse race. Three riders were jockeying for position in the race. Ken was behind, but jockeying for position.
2. . Fig. to work oneself into a desired position. The candidates were jockeying for position, trying to get the best television exposure. I was jockeying for position but running out of campaign money.
See also: for, jockey, position
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

jockey for position

Maneuver or manipulate for one's own benefit, as in The singers are always jockeying for position on stage. This expression, dating from about 1900, originally meant maneuvering a race horse into a better position for winning. It was transferred to other kinds of manipulation in the mid-1900s.
See also: for, jockey, position
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

jockey for position

If someone jockeys for position, they try to get into a better position or situation than people they are competing against. Reporters with their cameras jockeyed for position. Some presenters are already jockeying for position to see who will read the new Six O'Clock News. Note: Jockeying for position is also used as a noun. There was a constant jockeying for position between the superpowers. Note: The image here is of jockeys (= riders of race horses) trying to get their horses into the best position at the beginning of a race.
See also: for, jockey, position
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

jockey for position

manoeuvre in order to gain advantage over rivals in a competitive situation.
See also: for, jockey, position
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

jockey for position, to

To maneuver or manipulate, to further one’s own interest. The verb to jockey has meant to gain an advantage through adroit maneuvering from about 1700 or so. To jockey for position was used literally (meaning to maneuver a racehorse) in the early twentieth century and was only transferred to other endeavors about 1950. The London Times had it in 1955, “Lawyers jockeying for position to appear before the right judge.”
See also: for, jockey, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
A game that the Elite as well as the Gems need as the teams continue to jockey for position in the PBA D-League Aspirants Cup.
Agencies and personalities will continue to jockey for position and expand fiefdoms.
IOCs, including the world's majors, will descend on two key conferences about Iraqi oil in Dubai in September to jockey for position before the passing of the federal law sets off a scramble.
As free trade ramps up in Central America, the world's superbanks continue to jockey for position. Citigroup agreed to buy Grupo Finandero Uno, the largest credit card Issuer in the region at US$2.10 billion in assets.
Most of the ships are in tight formation, seeming to jockey for position in the center of a curious channel cut through the desert.
Kenneth Olden eliminated the need to jockey for position by simply extending an invitation to be heard.
As Dundee and Hamilton fought for the lead at the top of Division One, the chasing pack continued to jockey for position behind them.
Birds with large territories, such as eastern marsh wrens, tend to have smaller playlists than those, such as western marsh wrens, that have to jockey for position on tiny plots, Kroodsma finds.