foam at the mouth, to

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foam at the mouth

1. Literally, to produce foam from one's mouth, as due to a disease or other ailment. All of a sudden she collapsed in a fit, convulsing and foaming at the mouth.
2. Figuratively, to be viciously and uncontrollably angry or upset. The protesters had formed outside the courthouse, foaming at the mouth as the alleged murderer made his way up the steps.
See also: foam, mouth

foam at the mouth

 
1. Lit. to create froth or foam around the mouth, as with some diseases. The poor dog was foaming at the mouth and looked quite dangerous. What does it mean when a cow foams at the mouth?
2. Fig. to be extraordinarily angry. She was almost foaming at the mouth when she heard about the cost of the car repairs. Walter was foaming at the mouth with rage.
See also: foam, mouth

foam at the mouth

Be extremely angry, as in She was foaming at the mouth over the judge's ruling. This hyperbolic term uses the verb foam in the sense of "froth at the mouth," a usage generally applied to animals such as horses and dating from about a.d. 950. [1400s]
See also: foam, mouth

foam at the mouth

or

froth at the mouth

1. If someone foams at the mouth or froths at the mouth, they are very angry. Stewart was still foaming at the mouth about the incident when we spoke. The mere mention of `political correctness' is enough to cause journalists to froth at the mouth.
2. If someone foams at the mouth or froths at the mouth, they are very excited about something. The news that the team's top player is up for sale at the end of the season has got Premier League bosses foaming at the mouth in excitement. A new vintage home store has got A-list celebrities frothing at the mouth with excitement. Note: To foam or froth at the mouth literally means to produce a lot of foam or froth in the form of saliva. This is associated especially with having the disease rabies.
See also: foam, mouth

foam at the ˈmouth

(informal) be extremely angry: He stood there foaming at the mouth. I’ve never seen anybody so angry.
If an animal foams at the mouth, it has a mass of small bubbles in and around its mouth, especially because it is very ill or angry.
See also: foam, mouth

foam at the mouth, to

To express fury, to rage uncontrollably. Dogs afflicted with rabies foam at the mouth, their saliva forming a frothy substance, and also behave crazily. The analogy to extreme human anger was drawn as far back as the fifteenth century, and has been a cliché since the mid-nineteenth century. Washington lrving used the expression in Salmagundi (1807–08): “I expected every moment to see them fall down in convulsions and foam at the mouth.” Isaac Disraeli (father of Benjamin) used it more figuratively still in a piece of literary criticism: “A tedious invective, foaming at the mouth of its text with quotations and authorities” (Curiosities of Literature, 1817).
See also: foam
References in classic literature ?
Before that, I never knew what it was to foam at the mouth, but now the action of the sharp bit on my tongue and jaw, and the constrained position of my head and throat, always caused me to froth at the mouth more or less.
It would be contradictory for one in mademoiselle's state of agreeable jocularity to foam at the mouth, otherwise a tigerish expansion thereabouts might look as if a very little more would make her do it.
Won't he be apt to foam at the mouth a bit and stop giving you parts in his companies?'
Her breath was, however, expended in vain; for, although distinguished in her nation as a proficient in the art of abuse, she was permitted to work herself into such a fury as actually to foam at the mouth, without causing a muscle to vibrate in the motionless figure of the stranger.
Alison used to foam at the mouth at the very suggestion of BT Broadband eating up BT Openworld.
He started to foam at the mouth and he became very violently sick indeed.'
For Western viewers, the film's power depends on the startling revelation that the gods violently possessing the members of the cult--causing them to foam at the mouth, stagger like madmen, and snatch pieces of dog meat from a boiling pot--are not ancient spirits, but the supernatural shades of their colonial oppressors.