fly the coop, to

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fly the coop

To leave or escape (something). This lecture is so boring. Come on, let's fly the coop and go get a drink somewhere! I'm definitely flying the coop when I turn 18—I can't wait to have a little freedom!
See also: coop, fly

fly the coop

Fig. to escape; to get out or get away. (Alludes to a chicken escaping from a chicken coop.) I couldn't stand the party, so I flew the coop. The prisoner flew the coop at the first opportunity.
See also: coop, fly

fly the coop

Escape, run away, as in After years of fighting with my mother, my father finally flew the coop. This term originally meant "escape from jail," known as the coop in underworld slang since the late 1700s. [Late 1800s]
See also: coop, fly

fly the coop

If someone flies the coop, they leave the situation that they are in, often because they want to have more freedom or want to do something different. Aged 21, I felt the time was right to fly the coop and my parents were okay about it. It should be a proud moment, junior hairwasher grows up, graduates to senior stylist and then flies the coop to set up in a salon of his or her own. Compare with fly the nest. Note: A coop is a small cage in which chickens or small animals are kept. `Coop' is also American slang for a prison.
See also: coop, fly

fly the coop

make your escape. informal
1991 Julia Phillips You'll Never Eat Lunch In This Town Again Has David left? Nah, he would want to make sure I'm really ensconced, or I might fly the coop.
See also: coop, fly

fly the ˈcoop

(informal, especially American English) escape from a place: He was never happy living at home with his parents, so as soon as possible he flew the coop and got his own place.
A coop is a cage for chickens, hens, etc.
See also: coop, fly

fly the coop

tv. to escape from somewhere; to get away. I was afraid he would fly the coop if I didn’t tie him up.
See also: coop, fly

fly the coop, to

To escape. This expression, with its analogy to barnyard fowl escaping from a chicken coop or other enclosure, is American in origin and dates from about 1900. “On the third day I flew the coop,” wrote O. Henry (The Enchanted Profile, 1909). More recently Harry Kemelman used it in Saturday the Rabbi Went Hungry (1966): “This man ran off . . . flew the coop, beat it.”
See also: fly
References in periodicals archive ?
If we go by western standards, her daughter is 10 years past her due date to fly the coop and be independent.
If he's not willing to hear you out and do what he can to make you more comfortable with his heavily female flock, then it's time for you to fly the coop.
Why is that poor model of a cash courier not being allowed to fly the coop when everyone knows who gave her the dough?
Although, when 21-year-old Polly returns from two years travelling and working abroad and struggles to adjust to sharing the family's five-bed house with all her siblings, it becomes obvious that she's desperate to fly the coop.
While the researchers believe the sound was "a probable cue" for the birds to fly the coop, they do note the exact reason can't be pinned down.
Little wonder that he apparently wishes to be released from his gilded cage and be allowed to fly the coop to Crystal Palace, who may well be heading for relegation to the Championship unless he can do what miracleworker Tony Pulis did.
Little wonder that he apparently wishes to be released from his gilded cage and be allowed to fly the coop to Crystal Palace who may well be heading for relegation to the Championship unless he can do what miracle worker Tony Pulis did.
Sponsored by the Annenberg Foundation on behalf of Heart of Los Angeles, L.A.'s Suitcase Party will take over Clay Lacy Aviation at Van Nuys Airport, giving partygoers the chance to fly the coop.
THERE will be no 'Chicken' on the Wigan menu next season because George Carmont has decided to fly the coop.
Good sport Ms Jones, secretary at Ysgol San Sior, Llandudno, forlornly rang the Daily Post on her mobile phone to describe her plight: "It's so cold." But it wasn't long before she was able to fly the coop. The school hatched pounds 400 in all.
"We don't want Barclays to fly the coop like other firms given good money to come here."
Carol Weis' When The Cows Got Loose (0689851669, $16.95) receives zany and funny drawings by Ard Hoyt as it tells of twenty-six cows who decide to fly the coop as Ida Mae is daydreaming how she'll get famous.
John admits many first-time buyers featured on the show are desperate to fly the coop so they can start a love nest of their own - away from the eagle-eyes of Mammy and Daddy.
Nakedly autobiographical, the play is narrated by Tom Wingfield (Christian Slater), a would-be writer chafing in a dead-end job and itching to fly the coop like his father did, leaving his crippled and depressed older sister, Laura (Sarah Paulson), in the care of their frustrated, overbearing mother, Amanda (Jessica Lange).
By signalling that he's burned out and ready to fly the coop, Ashcroft has offered the president a significant opportunity to restore an appropriate level of moderation to his Cabinet.