eat someone out of house and home, to

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eat someone out of house and home

Fig. to eat everything that someone has in the house. That huge dog is eating us out of house and home. The entire football team came over and ate poor Sally out of house and home.
See also: and, eat, home, house, of, out
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eat someone out of house and home

Eat so much as to deplete someone's resources, as in The kids are eating her out of house and home. This hyperbole was well known by the time Shakespeare used it (2 Henry IV, 2:1): "He hath eaten me out of house and home."
See also: and, eat, home, house, of, out, someone
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

eat someone out of house and home

mainly BRITISH
If someone eats you out of house and home, they eat so much food that it costs you a lot of money to feed them. My children are eating me out of house and home! They eat everybody out of house and home but nobody minds because they provide such first-rate entertainment. Note: This expression was used in Shakespeare's play `Henry IV Part II', act 2 scene 1 (1597). When asked why she wants her lodger Sir John Falstaff arrested, the landlady Mistress Quickly replies: `He hath eaten me out of house and home; he hath put all my substance into that fat belly of his.'
See also: and, eat, home, house, of, out, someone
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

eat someone out of house and home

eat a lot of someone else's food. informal
See also: and, eat, home, house, of, out, someone
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

eat someone out of house and home, to

To consume a great deal. This expression is at least two thousand years old. It appeared in the Alexandrian philosopher Philo’s De Agricultura (ca. a.d. 40) as well as in numerous English writings, before Shakespeare used it for Mistress Quickly’s description of the gluttonous Falstaff: “He hath eaten me out of house and home” (Henry IV, Part 2, 2.1).
See also: and, eat, house, of, out, someone
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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