to distraction

to distraction

To a point in which one is very upset, irritated, or angry and one is unable to focus as a result. Used especially after the verb "drive." Leave your sister alone—she's got to finish her homework, and you are driving her to distraction.
See also: distraction

to diˈstraction

so that you become upset, excited or angry and not able to think clearly: The children are driving me to distraction today.
See also: distraction
References in classic literature ?
You are not only driving me to distraction but also ruining yourself with this eternal solicitude for your reputation.
Either of them are enough to drive any man to distraction," answered the old man.
Others more prone to distraction include those who drive often, and those with neurotic and extroverted personalities.
If he has the basics well under control, then it's time to move on to distraction.
Driven to Distraction at Work: How to Focus and Be More Productive by Edward M.
MORE than 90% of parents admit they are driven to distraction by their children and could be at risk while driving.
The authors compared acceptance to distraction, when both interventions involved a short protocol with examples, a metaphor, and an exercise aimed at coping with the experimentally induced pain.
On his first flight in this aircraft type, the pilot learned handheld digital navigation tools can contribute to distraction after he flew into Class D airspace.
But distraction is not all bad, and Wieth and Zacks have demonstrated that we can use our increased susceptibility to distraction at off-peak times to our advantage.
Lafeber's group, but patients were randomized to distraction alone or to distraction plus continuous passive joint motion.
RELATED ARTICLE: Ankle Study Added Motion to Distraction
Highbury Little Theatre, Age Concern, the National Grid and the police have joined forces to promote the educational play Driven to Distraction.
As the attention paid to distraction is heightened, one is reminded of the observation attributed to Mark Twain, that everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it.
The author's message is clear: "Self-reflection [is] the antidote to distraction for adolescents as well as adults" (p.
Drivers are not a homogeneous population, and one of the most important differences as it relates to distraction is age.