to (one's) credit

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to (one's) credit

A phrase acknowledging that one deserves credit or recognition for something positive. To his credit, he has donated consistently without requesting anything in return.
See also: credit
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This action is the third one agreed to by Credit Lyonnais and its parent with respect to Credit Lyonnais's participation in the rehabilitation of the Executive Life Insurance Company of California.
income tax law has long permitted a domestic corporate taxpayer to credit foreign taxes paid on repatriated income against its U.S.
Some are economic: At a time when average earnings are stagnant, when sudden income drops bemuse of layoffs or health problems are common, and when public and private insurance systems have frayed, families increasingly turn to credit cards to serve as their financial safety net.
As the agency with responsibility for the Truth in Lending Act regulations, the Federal Reserve has worked to promote access to credit and fair lending for underserved consumers and communities.
A recent FEI Research Foundation study, Access to Credit: How Corporations Are Changing Strategies to Ensure Growth and Sustain Liquidity in Good Times and Bad, provides insight into dealing with current market trends and improving access to credit.
Besides, if I don't have a right to credit, what makes the credit card companies think they have a right to interest?
Although, the character was not referring to credit cards back when the film was released in 1967, no one can deny that the credit card market has been booming during the past 30 years.
Both are designed to limit the ability to credit foreign taxes against U.S.
Section 201.51mlnterest rates applicable to credit extended by a Federal Reserve Bank.
CREDIT CARD NATION: The Consequences of America's Addiction to Credit
The rule replaces adjustment credit, which currently is extended at a below-market rate, with a new type of discount window credit called primary credit that will be broadly similar to credit programs offered by many other major central banks.
In 2000, Americans charged more than $515 billion on credit cards, according to credit card tracker CardWeb.com.