to come


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to come

From now; in the future. Environmental agencies will be dealing with fallout from the disaster for decades to come. They threatened to put a strike on my permanent records that they said would haunt me for years to come.
See also: come

to ˈcome

(used after a noun) in the future: They may well regret the decision in years to come.This will be a problem for some time to come (= for a period of time in the future).
See also: come
References in periodicals archive ?
I decided to attempt a crucifixion scene, starting with a black background, the color-foreground of hope to come out of the dark.
But Bean, who calls his book "an explanation of why [pro athletes] have not been able to come out," says the closet is an unfortunate necessity in major league baseball today.
Paul longed to come and see his beloved children in the faith but was prevented, and so he sent Timothy to find out if they survived.
Aside from the obvious good looks, I was moved by his decision to come out and face the world.
The great news that Riegel would be working closely with Emmy winner Susan Lucci (who plays Erica) got better when she found out she'd be playing the first central character in all of soapdom to come out of the closet.
Nobel's story highlights an increasingly common trend among gay and lesbian youth: Sexual orientation is not something they are just beginning to come to terms with in high school or in college.
I can just imagine a teenage homosexual watching the show with his parents and using that as a springboard to come out.