to coin a phrase

to coin a phrase

A set phrase said after one uses a new expression. It is typically used jocularly to indicate the opposite (i.e. that one has just used a well-known or trite saying). Well, we can't do anything about it now, so que sera sera, to coin a phrase.
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to coin a phrase

You say to coin a phrase to show that you are using an expression that people will know. Stunned Jackson was, to coin a phrase, `sick as a parrot'. Note: To coin a new word means to invent it or use it for the first time. In this expression, the term is being used ironically.
See also: coin, phrase

to coin a phrase

1 said ironically when introducing a banal remark or cliché. 2 said when introducing a new expression or a variation on a familiar one.
See also: coin, phrase

to coin a ˈphrase

used for introducing an expression that you have invented or to apologize for using a well-known idiom or phrase instead of an original one: Oh well, no news is good news, to coin a phrase.
See also: coin, phrase

coin a phrase, to

To fashion an expression. This term, dating from the 1940s, is often used ironically to apologize for using a cliché, as in “He acts like the cock of the walk, to coin a phrase.” Of course it can also be used straightforwardly and refer to inventing an expression, a usage dating from the late 1500s.
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References in periodicals archive ?
To coin a phrase used by a popular satirical journal: "We should be told"
Money makes the art world go round (to coin a phrase), and a semi-ironic clinking-clanking will surely issue from the Salzburger Kunstverein's galleries this summer.
And she raised a laugh when she pinched her husband's famous slogan, saying: "To coin a phrase we need education, education, education.
Looking at these figures, you wonder not why there has been so much political "malaise" (to coin a phrase) since 1973, but why there hasn't been a revolution.