to coin a phrase

to coin a phrase

A set phrase said after one uses a new expression. It is typically used jocularly to indicate the opposite (i.e. that one has just used a well-known or trite saying). Well, we can't do anything about it now, so que sera sera, to coin a phrase.
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to coin a phrase

You say to coin a phrase to show that you are using an expression that people will know. Stunned Jackson was, to coin a phrase, `sick as a parrot'. Note: To coin a new word means to invent it or use it for the first time. In this expression, the term is being used ironically.
See also: coin, phrase

to coin a phrase

1 said ironically when introducing a banal remark or cliché. 2 said when introducing a new expression or a variation on a familiar one.
See also: coin, phrase

to coin a ˈphrase

used for introducing an expression that you have invented or to apologize for using a well-known idiom or phrase instead of an original one: Oh well, no news is good news, to coin a phrase.
See also: coin, phrase
References in periodicals archive ?
You might call it ``irrational exuberance,'' to coin a phrase.