bite the bullet, to

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bite the bullet

To do or accept something unpleasant, often after a period of hesitation. The phrase is thought to have come from the military, perhaps because biting a bullet was a common practice for patients, due to a lack of anesthesia. I don't actually enjoy cleaning, but I bite the bullet and do it so that everything in my house isn't covered in a thick layer of dust. I know she's disappointed to have not gotten her dream job, but the sooner she bites the bullet and accepts it, the sooner she can move on.
See also: bite, bullet
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bite the bullet

Sl. to accept something difficult and try to live with it. You are just going to have to bite the bullet and make the best of it. Jim bit the bullet and accepted what he knew had to be.
See also: bite, bullet
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bite the bullet

Behave bravely or stoically when facing pain or a difficult situation, as in If they want to cut the budget deficit, they are going to have to bite the bullet and find new sources of revenue . This phrase is of military origin, but the precise allusion is uncertain. Some say it referred to the treatment of a wounded soldier without anesthesia, so that he would be asked to bite on a lead bullet during treatment. Also, Francis Grose's Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1796) holds that grenadiers being disciplined with the cat-o'nine-tails would bite on a bullet to avoid crying out in pain.
See also: bite, bullet
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bite the bullet

COMMON If you bite the bullet, you accept a difficult situation or force yourself to do something unpleasant. The same stressful event might make one person utterly miserable, while another will bite the bullet and make the best of it. If your internet connection isn't working, you'll probably have to bite the bullet and phone the technical support department. Note: During battles in the last century, wounded men were sometimes given a bullet to bite on while the doctor operated on them without any anaesthetic or painkillers.
See also: bite, bullet
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

bite the bullet

face up to doing something difficult or unpleasant; stoically avoid showing fear or distress.
This phrase dates from the days before anaesthetics, when wounded soldiers were given a bullet or similar solid object to clench between their teeth when undergoing surgery.
1998 Joyce Holms Bad Vibes Once he accepted it as inevitable he usually bit the bullet and did what was required of him with a good grace.
See also: bite, bullet
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bite the ˈbullet

(informal) realize that you cannot avoid something unpleasant, and so accept it: Getting your car repaired is often an expensive business, but all you can do is bite the bullet and pay up.This expression comes from the old custom of giving soldiers a bullet to bite on during medical operations, which had to be done without any drugs to stop the pain.
See also: bite, bullet
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bite the bullet

tv. to accept something difficult and try to live with it. You are just going to have to bite the bullet and make the best of it.
See also: bite, bullet
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

bite the bullet

Slang
To face a painful situation bravely and stoically.
See also: bite, bullet
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bite the bullet, to

To brace oneself against pain or a difficult experience. This expression is believed to come from the days when those wounded in battle had to be treated without anesthesia and were made to bite on a lead bullet to brace themselves against the pain of surgery. Certainly this was the meaning in Rudyard Kipling’s The Light That Failed (1891): “Bite on the bullet, old man, and don’t let them think you’re afraid.” However, some authorities suggest that the term comes from the practice of gunners biting off the end of a paper-tube cartridge in order to expose the powder to the spark. In times of anesthesia and more sophisticated weaponry, biting the bullet became entirely figurative, as when P. G. Wodehouse wrote, “Brace up and bite the bullet. I’m afraid I have bad news” (The Inimitable Jeeves, 1923).
See also: bite
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

bite the bullet

To bear up in an unpleasant or a difficult situation. In the days before anesthesia, a wounded soldier about to undergo surgery was given a bullet to clamp in his teeth and bear down on so he wouldn't bite off his tongue from the pain.
See also: bite, bullet
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
'We have been asking our people to bite the bullet for the sake of the common good,' Ejercito said.
IT appears the gathering of the Labour clans is proving to be an opportunity for all those MPs, 174 who opposed the appointment of Jeremy Corbyn but had to bite the bullet, to peak out tortoise like from under their shells.
Now is the time to bite the bullet and move on to a site Tees Valley actually do own.
We have to bite the bullet. Ito naman ay para sa kanila.
We were aware in advance that tickets were PS23 each (total of PS69 for the three of us) but we decided to bite the bullet and go.
He needs to bite the bullet, get on with it and find himself a new club.
Coleen says You just have to bite the bullet and ask him if he fancies your mate.
But I think it's time to bite the bullet or you could be in the same situation in another four years.
Sadly, you'll have to bite the bullet, so whip out the starter motor, get it reconditioned and you should be able to cut the bill to around pounds 500.
They simply had to bite the bullet and resume normal work.
After Jane's dealings with serial killer Red John - and arguably being at fault for his wife and daughter's brutal murders - he still has reservations about CBI work, but is forced to bite the bullet to help his relative.
TIME to bite the bullet and throw in a banker, otherwise the perm will be in danger of becoming unmanageable and expensive.
"The players are anxious to play and we'll have to bite the bullet if again the workload these extra matches bring about affects us in the Premier League."
"Liverpool needs to bite the bullet and move from a grants-based culture to one based on enterprise."
Congress needs to bite the bullet and approve public financing of campaigns.