to a T


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Related to to a T: to a tee

to a T

Perfectly; completely; exactly. The origin of the phrase is uncertain. You look beautiful. That color really suits you to a T. You have to make sure the fabric lines up to a T, or the stitching will start coming out before too long. Bold, reckless, and daring—that fits him to a T all right.

to a T

Also, to a turn. Perfectly, exactly right, as in The description fitted him to a T, or The roast was done to a turn. The first expression, dating from the late 1600s, may allude to the T-square, used for accurate drawing, but some think it refers to crossing one's T's. The variant alludes to meat being turned on a spit until it is cooked to the proper degree. The variant was first recorded in 1780.

to a T (or tee)

exactly; to perfection. informal
This origin of this idiom, which dates back to the late 17th century, is uncertain. Attempts to link T with either a golfer's tee or a builder's T-square are unconvincing. It is possible that the underlying idea is that of completing the letter T by putting in the cross stroke, but the early 17th-century expression to a tittle was identical in meaning, and it is possible that T may be an abbreviation of tittle .
2000 Post (Denver) He's got Ralphie's same non-charismatic charisma down to a T.

to a ˈT/ˈtee

(British English, informal) exactly; perfectly: This new job suits me to a T (= it is perfect for me).This portrait is excellent — it’s Rosemary to a T. This may be a short form of the old phrase to a tittle which meant ‘to the smallest detail’. A tittle was a small mark or point on a letter.
See also: tee

to a T

Perfectly; precisely: This actor fits the role to a T.

to a T

Exactly so; a perfect fit. Some writers believe this expression, which dates from the late seventeenth century, alludes to the T-square, used by draftsmen for accurate drawing. Others lean toward the idea that it comes from crossing one’s t’s (see dot the I’s and cross the T’s). An early appearance in print is in George Farquar’s play Love in a Bottle (1699, 4.3): “He answered the description . . . to a T, sir.”