tired


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dead tired

Totally exhausted or fatigued. I was dead tired after working my third 12-hour shift in a row.
See also: dead, tired

be tired to death of (something)

To be or become exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm tired to death of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've been tired to death of these boring lectures lately.
See also: death, of, tired

tired to death of (something)

Exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm tired to death of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've grown tired to death of these boring lectures.
See also: death, of, tired

tired and emotional

A semi-polite or humorous euphemism for drunkenness. Primarily heard in UK. I might be mistaken, but Sean's father looked a bit tired and emotional at the picnic, didn't he? You must excuse me, I'm a bit tired and emotional just now. I think I'd best be going home.
See also: and, emotional, tired

be sick and tired of (something)

To be or become exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm so sick and tired of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've been sick and tired of these boring lectures lately.
See also: and, of, sick, tired

be tired and emotional

To be drunk. (A semi-polite or humorous euphemism.) Primarily heard in UK. I might be mistaken, but did it seem to you like Sean's father was a bit tired and emotional at the picnic? You must excuse me, I'm a bit tired and emotional just now. I think I'd best be going home to bed.
See also: and, emotional, tired

dog-tired

Exhausted. I'm always dog-tired after a day at the amusement park. Mom was dog-tired and needed a nap before dinner.

sick and tired of (something)

Exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm sick and tired of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've grown sick and tired of these boring lectures.
See also: and, of, sick, tired

tire of (someone or something)

To lose interest in or patience with someone or something. He always tires of his girlfriends after a few weeks and moves on to someone new. I tired of working in finance and decided to pursue a career in writing.
See also: of, tire

tire (one) out

To exhaust, fatigue, or deplete the energy of someone or an animal. That long meeting really tired me out. Our new puppy has so much energy that I have to take him for a run each day to tire him out.
See also: out, tire

be tired of (something)

To be exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm so tired of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I'm tired of all the boring lectures.
See also: of, tired

get tired of (something)

To become exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I've gotten so tired of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've gotten tired of these boring lectures lately.
See also: get, of, tired

dead on one's feet

Also, dead tired. Extremely weary, as in Mom was in the kitchen all day and was dead on her feet, or I'd love to go, but I'm dead tired. The use of dead for "tired to exhaustion" dates from the early 1800s, and dead on one's feet, conjuring up the image of a dead person still standing up, dates from the late 1800s.
See also: dead, feet, on

sick and tired

Also, sick or tired to death . Thoroughly weary or bored, as in I'm sick and tired of these begging phone calls, or She was sick to death of that endless recorded music. These hyperbolic expressions of exasperation imply one is weary to the point of illness or death. The first dates from the late 1700s, the first variant from the late 1800s, and the second variant from the first half of the 1700s.
See also: and, sick, tired

tired out

Also, tired to death. Exhausted, as in She looked tired out after that trip, or He came home tired to death. The first term dates from the second half of the 1500s; the second, a hyperbole, was first recorded in 1740. Also see sick and tired; to death.
See also: out, tired

dog tired

extremely tired; utterly worn out. informal
The image here, and in the variant dog weary , is of a dog exhausted after a long chase or hunt.
See also: dog, tired

sick and tired

annoyed about or bored with something and unwilling to put up with it any longer. informal
See also: and, sick, tired

tired and emotional

drunk.
This is a humorous euphemism, used originally in newspapers in contexts where the word drunk would lay the publication open to a libel charge. It is particularly associated with the British satirical magazine Private Eye.
See also: and, emotional, tired

be/get tired of something/doing something

be/get bored or annoyed with something/doing something: We got tired of the country and we moved into town.I’m tired of listening to his complaints.
See also: get, of, something, tired

sick and tired

Thoroughly weary, discouraged, or bored.
See also: and, sick, tired
References in classic literature ?
Well, they can eat beef and bread and butter, if they are hungry, only it's mortifying to have to spend your whole morning for nothing," thought Jo, as she rang the bell half an hour later than usual, and stood, hot, tired, and dispirited, surveying the feast spread before Laurie, accustomed to all sorts of elegance, and Miss Crocker, whose tattling tongue would report them far and wide.
Meg helped Jo clear away the remains of the feast, which took half the afternoon and left them so tired that they agreed to be contented with tea and toast for supper.
As twilight fell, dewy and still, one by one they gathered on the porch where the June roses were budding beautifully, and each groaned or sighed as she sat down, as if tired or troubled.
She had wandered about long enough to feel too tired to wander any farther, and she turned back.
We go down Lake Bennett, snow, ice, wind like a gale, but woman is very tired and go to sleep.
They are like dead people they are so tired, but they say,
We limp into Circle City, and even I, Sitka Charley, am tired.
Happy indeed is he, who has his top and cares still to spin it; for to be tired of our tops is to be tired of life, saith the preacher.
He was so tired that he flopped down upon the nice soft sand on the floor of the rabbit-hole, and shut his eyes.
She was tired and panting and evidently thought of declining, but immediately put her hand gaily on the man's shoulder, smiling at Prince Andrew.