tired


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be sick and tired of (something)

To be or become exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm so sick and tired of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've been sick and tired of these boring lectures lately.
See also: and, of, sick, tired

be tired and emotional

To be drunk. (A semi-polite or humorous euphemism.) Primarily heard in UK. I might be mistaken, but did it seem to you like Sean's father was a bit tired and emotional at the picnic? You must excuse me, I'm a bit tired and emotional just now. I think I'd best be going home to bed.
See also: and, emotional, tired

be tired of (something)

1. To be bored of something. I'm a little tired of pizza. Can we get something else?
2. To be exceedingly wearied or exasperated by something. I'm so tired of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I'm tired of the endless lectures.
See also: of, tired

be tired to death of (something)

To be or become exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm tired to death of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've been tired to death of these boring lectures lately.
See also: death, of, tired, to

beat tired

Completely exhausted, fatigued, or worn out. I was beat tired after only the first mile of the race. I could barely even walk for the rest of it!
See also: beat, tired

dead tired

Totally exhausted or fatigued. I was dead tired after working my third 12-hour shift in a row.
See also: dead, tired

dog-tired

Exhausted. I'm always dog-tired after a day at the amusement park. Mom was dog-tired and needed a nap before dinner.

get tired of (something)

1. To become bored of something. I don't want to get tired of pizza, so let's get something else every once in a while.
2. To become exceedingly wearied or exasperated by something. I've gotten so tired of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've gotten tired of the endless lectures.
See also: get, of, tired

sick and tired of (something)

Exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm sick and tired of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've grown sick and tired of these boring lectures.
See also: and, of, sick, tired

tire of (someone or something)

To lose interest in or patience with someone or something. He always tires of his toys after a few months, so we sell them online. I tired of working in finance and decided to pursue a career in writing.
See also: of, tire

tire out

To exhaust, fatigue, or deplete the energy of someone or an animal. A noun or pronoun can be used between "tire" and "out." These long meetings are starting to tire out the staff. Our new puppy has so much energy that I have to take him for a run each day to tire him out.
See also: out, tire

tired and emotional

A semi-polite or humorous euphemism for drunkenness. Primarily heard in UK. I might be mistaken, but Sean's father looked a bit tired and emotional at the picnic, didn't he? You must excuse me, I'm a bit tired and emotional just now. I think I'd best be going home.
See also: and, emotional, tired

tired out

Exceptionally exhausted or fatigued. All that running around has the kids pretty tired out, so we might have a relaxed afternoon inside. I'm pretty tired out after all that travel, but it's good to finally be home.
See also: out, tired

tired to death

1. Extremely exhausted or fatigued. I'm tired to death after all that travel, but it's good to finally be home. You must be tired to death from such a long bicycle ride—you were gone for nearly four hours!
2. Exceptionally wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm getting tired to death of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've grown tired to death of these boring lectures.
See also: death, tired, to

tired to death of (something)

Exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm tired to death of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've grown tired to death of these boring lectures.
See also: death, of, tired, to

you must be tired, because you've been running through my mind all day

A corny pick-up line used to convey one's (typically a male's) romantic interest in someone else. A pun on the word "running." (If something is running through one's mind, they are thinking about it, while the physical act of running would cause tiredness.) A: "Baby, you must be tired, because you've been running through my mind all day!" B: "Oh boy. Yeah, I'm not interested."
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

tire out

to become exhausted. I tire out easily. When I had the flu, I found that I tired out easily.
See also: out, tire

tire someone out

to exhaust someone. The extra work tired him out a lot. Too much work will tire out the horses.
See also: out, tire
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dead on one's feet

Also, dead tired. Extremely weary, as in Mom was in the kitchen all day and was dead on her feet, or I'd love to go, but I'm dead tired. The use of dead for "tired to exhaustion" dates from the early 1800s, and dead on one's feet, conjuring up the image of a dead person still standing up, dates from the late 1800s.
See also: dead, feet, on

sick and tired

Also, sick or tired to death . Thoroughly weary or bored, as in I'm sick and tired of these begging phone calls, or She was sick to death of that endless recorded music. These hyperbolic expressions of exasperation imply one is weary to the point of illness or death. The first dates from the late 1700s, the first variant from the late 1800s, and the second variant from the first half of the 1700s.
See also: and, sick, tired

tired out

Also, tired to death. Exhausted, as in She looked tired out after that trip, or He came home tired to death. The first term dates from the second half of the 1500s; the second, a hyperbole, was first recorded in 1740. Also see sick and tired; to death.
See also: out, tired
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dog tired

extremely tired; utterly worn out. informal
The image here, and in the variant dog weary , is of a dog exhausted after a long chase or hunt.
See also: dog, tired

sick and tired

annoyed about or bored with something and unwilling to put up with it any longer. informal
See also: and, sick, tired

tired and emotional

drunk.
This is a humorous euphemism, used originally in newspapers in contexts where the word drunk would lay the publication open to a libel charge. It is particularly associated with the British satirical magazine Private Eye.
See also: and, emotional, tired
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

be/get tired of something/doing something

be/get bored or annoyed with something/doing something: We got tired of the country and we moved into town.I’m tired of listening to his complaints.
See also: get, of, something, tired
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

tire out

v.
To deplete the strength or energy of someone or something; fatigue someone or something: Traveling always tires me out. The long ride tired out the horses.
See also: out, tire
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sick and tired

Thoroughly weary, discouraged, or bored.
See also: and, sick, tired
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dead on one's feet

Extremely tired. This graphic hyperbole, with its use of “dead” in the meaning of “utterly fatigued,” is probably related to dead tired, where “dead” means “very” or “absolutely.” This locution has been traced to Irish speech and appears in such clichés as dead wrong for “completely mistaken,” dead right for “absolutely correct,” dead certain for “totally sure,” and others. “Dead on one’s feet” became common in the mid-twentieth century. John Braine used it in Life at the Top (1962): “Honestly, I’m dead on my feet.”
See also: dead, feet, on

sick and tired

Disgusted, completely weary of. This expression, also put as sick or tired to death, suggests one is fed up to the point of illness or death. J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur used it in Sketches of 18th-Century America (1783): “I am quite sick and tired of these pretended conscientious non-fighting mortals.”
See also: and, sick, tired
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in classic literature ?
He was very tired. The thought came to him that an accident would be a piece of luck, so that he could be taken to a hospital and lie there, in a clean bed, for weeks.
One or two tried to make friends with him, but he was too tired and too wretched to accept their advances.
"Well, they can eat beef and bread and butter, if they are hungry, only it's mortifying to have to spend your whole morning for nothing," thought Jo, as she rang the bell half an hour later than usual, and stood, hot, tired, and dispirited, surveying the feast spread before Laurie, accustomed to all sorts of elegance, and Miss Crocker, whose tattling tongue would report them far and wide.
Meg helped Jo clear away the remains of the feast, which took half the afternoon and left them so tired that they agreed to be contented with tea and toast for supper.
As twilight fell, dewy and still, one by one they gathered on the porch where the June roses were budding beautifully, and each groaned or sighed as she sat down, as if tired or troubled.
"I'm tired of it and mean to go to work at something right off."
Her feeling of loneliness became more pronounced, and she felt tired. Her position on the heeling boat irked her, and she remembered the headache he had cured and the soothing rest that resided in him.
I walk all night and am much tired. I cook breakfast, I eat, then I sleep on the beach three hours.
Also is she very tired. I run canoe through rapids to Lake Bennett.
They get tired. They cry under their breaths to themselves.
They are like dead people they are so tired, but they say,