tired


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dead tired

Totally exhausted or fatigued. I was dead tired after working my third 12-hour shift in a row.
See also: dead, tired

be tired to death of (something)

To be or become exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm tired to death of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've been tired to death of these boring lectures lately.
See also: death, of, tired

tired to death of (something)

Exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm tired to death of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've grown tired to death of these boring lectures.
See also: death, of, tired

tired and emotional

A semi-polite or humorous euphemism for drunkenness. Primarily heard in UK. I might be mistaken, but Sean's father looked a bit tired and emotional at the picnic, didn't he? You must excuse me, I'm a bit tired and emotional just now. I think I'd best be going home.
See also: and, emotional, tired

be sick and tired of (something)

To be or become exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm so sick and tired of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've been sick and tired of these boring lectures lately.
See also: and, of, sick, tired

be tired and emotional

To be drunk. (A semi-polite or humorous euphemism.) Primarily heard in UK. I might be mistaken, but did it seem to you like Sean's father was a bit tired and emotional at the picnic? You must excuse me, I'm a bit tired and emotional just now. I think I'd best be going home to bed.
See also: and, emotional, tired

dog-tired

Exhausted. I'm always dog-tired after a day at the amusement park. Mom was dog-tired and needed a nap before dinner.

sick and tired of (something)

Exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm sick and tired of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've grown sick and tired of these boring lectures.
See also: and, of, sick, tired

dead on one's feet

Also, dead tired. Extremely weary, as in Mom was in the kitchen all day and was dead on her feet, or I'd love to go, but I'm dead tired. The use of dead for "tired to exhaustion" dates from the early 1800s, and dead on one's feet, conjuring up the image of a dead person still standing up, dates from the late 1800s.
See also: dead, feet, on

sick and tired

Also, sick or tired to death . Thoroughly weary or bored, as in I'm sick and tired of these begging phone calls, or She was sick to death of that endless recorded music. These hyperbolic expressions of exasperation imply one is weary to the point of illness or death. The first dates from the late 1700s, the first variant from the late 1800s, and the second variant from the first half of the 1700s.
See also: and, sick, tired

tired out

Also, tired to death. Exhausted, as in She looked tired out after that trip, or He came home tired to death. The first term dates from the second half of the 1500s; the second, a hyperbole, was first recorded in 1740. Also see sick and tired; to death.
See also: out, tired

dog tired

extremely tired; utterly worn out. informal
The image here, and in the variant dog weary , is of a dog exhausted after a long chase or hunt.
See also: dog, tired

sick and tired

annoyed about or bored with something and unwilling to put up with it any longer. informal
See also: and, sick, tired

tired and emotional

drunk.
This is a humorous euphemism, used originally in newspapers in contexts where the word drunk would lay the publication open to a libel charge. It is particularly associated with the British satirical magazine Private Eye.
See also: and, emotional, tired

be/get tired of something/doing something

be/get bored or annoyed with something/doing something: We got tired of the country and we moved into town.I’m tired of listening to his complaints.
See also: get, of, something, tired

sick and tired

Thoroughly weary, discouraged, or bored.
See also: and, sick, tired
References in classic literature ?
You began to be a young lady so early, that you are tired of everything at twenty-two.
Yes, that 's little Jane," returned Polly, adding, when she had passed, with a nod and a friendly "Don't get tired, Jenny," "we help one another at our house, and every fine morning Jenny takes Johnny Kean out when she goes for her own walk.
But I should think she would get tired to death, sitting there making hoods and petticoats day after day," said Fanny, after thinking over Jenny's story for a few minutes, for seeing the girl seemed to bring it nearer, and make it more real to her.
I don't think it is nowadays," said Fanny, with a tired sort of sigh.
Next day began the wholesome out-of-door life, which works such wonders with tired minds and feeble bodies.
They led a very merry life; for the Atkinson girls kept up a sort of perpetual picnic; and did it so capitally, that one was never tired of it.
They are like dead people they are so tired, but they say,
We limp into Circle City, and even I, Sitka Charley, am tired.
At every camp, at every post, at every Indian village, do they cut out the tired dogs and put in fresh dogs.
You will feel very differently after you get over being tired and bewildered," said Anne, who, knowing a certain thing that Leslie did not know, did not feel herself called upon to waste overmuch sympathy.
Behind him came a peasant, and he too was evidently tired, for he stopped at once without waiting to mow up to Levin, and began whetting his scythe.
I am so tired of it,' said Tip, 'that I have cut it.
When he was tired of nothing to do, and disposed in its turn to cut even that, he graciously consented to go to Canada.
Carrying out which intention, he presented himself before her at the expiration of a month, in rags, without shoes, and much more tired than ever.