tip over

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tip over

1. To overturn or fall to the side. After he ran into the table, the vase wobbled and tipped over, but luckily it didn't break. I got so woozy from the medication that I actually tipped over at one point.
2. To cause someone or something to overturn or fall onto their or its side. A noun or pronoun can be used between "tip" and "over." The rush of protestors tipped over the security guards keeping them from entering the building. Strong winds will tip your boat over if you don't secure the sails properly.
See also: over, tip

tip someone over

to cause someone to fall. Oh! You almost tipped me over! Todd fell against Maggie and tipped her over.
See also: over, tip

tip something over

to cause something to fall over. Did you tip this chair over? Who tipped over the chair?
See also: over, tip

tip over

to topple over and fall. Roger shook the table slightly, and the vase tipped over. The truck was overloaded and looked so heavy that I thought it would tip over.
See also: over, tip

tip over

v.
1. To totter and fall; overturn: The vase tipped over and water poured out across the table.
2. To cause something to totter and fall; cause something to overturn: The wind tipped over the sailboat. Don't stand up in the canoe, or you will tip it over.
See also: over, tip
References in periodicals archive ?
2211, the Stop Tip-overs of Unstable, Risky Dressers on Youth Act or the STURDY Act, introduced by Consumer Protection and Commerce Subcommittee Chair Jan Schakowsky (D-IL), would direct the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to issue a consumer product safety standard for clothing storage units to prevent them from tipping over onto children.
The number of injuries involving televisions and other furniture tipping over onto children has increased since the early 1990s, a US study has found.
According to the study, most furniture tip-over-related injuries occurred among children younger than 7 years of age and resulted from TVs tipping over. More than one-quarter of the injuries occurred when children pulled over or climbed on furniture.
Children between 13 and 17 years of age were more Likely to suffer injuries from desks, cabinets or bookshelves tipping over. For more information about the study, visit injurycenter.org.
Aside from failing out of the cart (usually onto linoleum, concrete, or asphalt), children are injured by the cart tipping over when they hang onto the outside, by becoming entrapped, by striking a cart, and by being run over by a cart.
The possibility of these carts tipping over predisposes the infant to tremendous risk, especially when placed in the highest point of the cart where the center of gravity is highest.
Such improvements include new standards to improve reliability of suction cups that anchor the bath seat to the floor of the tub; standards for leg holes so that infants cannot slip through; and a stability standard that would prevent the seats from tipping over too readily.
"I believe that the Commission should proceed with an ANPR to investigate the possibility of developing a bath seat that resists tipping over on both non-skid and traditional bathtub surfaces." (5)
Bush will help consumers identify the carts and is offering a free repair kit to consumers to help prevent the carts from tipping over. Consumers should call Bush at (800) 950-4782 or visit the Web site at www.bushfurniture.com.
Sauder received one report of a cart tipping over; no injury was reported.
ARCHBOLD, Ohio-While Sauder Woodworking recalls about 2 million TV carts because of a risk of their tipping over, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is warning that the entire industry is under scrutiny for similar dangers.
The company said it had received 13 reports of these carts tipping over, causing the television sets on them to fall.
Most recently, the two companies have included literature in each item calling attention to the potential for tipping over; and offering suggestions, such as removing the bottom glides, to reduce the possibility.