tip off

(redirected from tip them off)

tip off

1. verb To give one secret, private, or insider information or news, especially that which gives them or someone else an advantage of some kind. A noun or pronoun can be used between "tip" and "off." An anonymous source tipped off reporters that the senator had been using campaign money to fund private trips to the Bahamas. I tipped the cops off about the gang's plan to rob the bank.
2. noun The act of giving one secret, private, or insider information or news, especially that which gives them or someone else an advantage of some kind. As a noun, it is usually hyphenated. Thanks to an anonymous tip-off, police were able to blow the lid off the smuggling ring.
3. noun The start of a basketball game, which is begun with a jump ball ("the tip"). As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated. Yeah, I'd love to watch the game. What time is tip-off?
4. noun By extension, the start of some event. As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated. The convention runs all weekend. Tip-off is on Friday at 4.
See also: off, tip

tip someone off (about someone or something)

 and tip someone off (on someone or something)
to give someone a valuable piece of news about someone or something. I tipped the cops off about Max and where he was going to be that night. I tipped off the mayor about the financial crisis.
See also: off, tip

tip off

Supply with secret or private information; also, warn or alert. For example, The broker often tipped her off about stocks about to go down in price, or Somehow they were tipped off and left the country before the police could catch them. [Colloquial; late 1800s]
See also: off, tip

tip off

v.
1. To provide someone or something with a piece of confidential, advance, or inside information: A betrayed gang member tipped off the police. Someone must have tipped the press off about the company's financial troubles.
2. To begin with a jump ball. Used of a basketball game, tournament, or season: The basketball game tips off at 8:00.
See also: off, tip

tip-off

n. a clue; an indication. The tip-off was when the dog started wagging his tail. We knew you were hiding somewhere close.
References in periodicals archive ?
POLICE want "community spotters" to tip them off about motorists who routinely use their phones at the wheel as they drive to work or on the school run.
The man, described by media reports as in his early 50s, had called police five minutes beforehand to tip them off and is thought to have psychological problems, Turkish Interior Minister Muammer Guler told reporters.
People are fed up with drug-dealing and, if the police don't catch them red-handed, someone may just tip them off via Crimestoppers.
Some even pay police and firefighters to tip them off when a murder happens.
While the tale most told is of Diana constantly on the run from paparazzi photographers, many of the contributors here claim the Princess of Wales would regularly tip them off a bouther movements.
Police are also calling on members of the public to use a hotline to tip them off about anyone they suspect of preaching hatred.
In the scheme police in County Durham are setting up secure post boxes so residents can tip them off about criminals anonymously.
Reports claimed gangsters had bribed race employees to tip them off about the times and routes of the races.
88 percent of dentists think that children are afraid of them only because parents or older relatives tip them off.
Some of the long-term unemployed will be issued with pagers and mobile phones to tip them off about available jobs.
Access to criminal records is restricted by law, but members of the public contacted programme makers and newspapers to tip them off.
Unemployed people will be provided with free transport, money to buy smart clothes, and mobile phones to tip them off about vacancies.
PLYMOUTH'S unemployed are to be offered free transport, money for smart clothes and mobile phones to tip them off about jobs under a new Government scheme.