tiny

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the patter of tiny feet

The sound of young children, especially in one's home. It was devastating to learn I couldn't conceive, after dreaming for years of hearing the patter of tiny feet.
See also: feet, of, patter, tiny

tiny house

A very small house, often 400 square feet (37 sq m) in size or smaller. We're thinking of buying a tiny house so as to not to tie all of our money up in home ownership.
See also: house, tiny

tiniest thing

The smallest, most trivial, or most inconsequential thing or aspect. She's so sensitive—the tiniest things seem to get her in a huff. My boss is such a perfectionist that he will halt production to scrutinize the tiniest thing he thinks could be improved.
See also: thing, tiny

patter of tiny feet

the sound of young children; having children in the household. I really liked having the patter of tiny feet in the house. Darling, I think we're going to be hearing the patter of tiny feet soon.
See also: feet, of, patter, tiny

the patter of tiny feet

used to refer to the expectation of the birth of a baby.
2002 Pride If, like me, you find yourself single in the penultimate year of your twenties and the only patter of tiny feet is your neighbour's cat, then chop, chop ladies—so much to do so little time.
See also: feet, of, patter, tiny

the patter of tiny ˈfeet

(informal or humorous) a way of referring to children when somebody wants, or is going to have, a baby: We can’t wait to hear the patter of tiny feet.
See also: feet, of, patter, tiny

patter of tiny feet

n. the sound of young children; having children in the household. Darling, I think we’re going to be hearing the patter of tiny feet soon.
See also: feet, of, patter, tiny
References in periodicals archive ?
Still other people enlisted in the Bay Area Radical Union, which evolved into the Revolutionary Communist Party; others joined the October League and a number of tinier groups--Maoist organizations, one and all.
At the tip of each seta are 1000 even tinier pads, called spatulae, which are only 200 nm wide--below the wavelength of visible light.
Well, I'm a person with an appetite that turned out to be a darned sight tinier than the supposedly dinky parmo - by at least two-thirds.
In an eleven-inch-tall clay figurine, the artist Armando Condoli has meticulously sculpted in clay a miniature house, placing a second, even tinier house-form atop the roof of his figurine.
One of the movie and the original theatrical tinier, and a commentary with myself and the whole band watching the film and talking about it.
DPM tends to dominate the particulate numbers in a roadside setting, says David Kittelson, a professor in the University of Minnesota's Department of Mechanical Engineering, although gasoline engines tend to produce even tinier particulates than diesel engines.
"Clearly, this is a much, much tinier amount than Martin County."
Funny--that's not what the Post said about Whitewater, a scandal that looked tiny when Republicans dredged it up back in 1993 and looks even tinier today.
Therein lie opportunities and challenges for National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) researchers who are aiding industry efforts to develop surface protecting and lubricating films that will shield super-small machines and their even tinier components from friction and wear.
A tiny Brazilian fly whose even tinier larvae eat the heads off stinging fire ants will be unleashed across the South this spring, according to the Associated Press.
Back street garages and the industry's tinier showrooms could find themselves squeezed out as savings are reserved for larger and more established dealerships.
This is a tinier commitment than that of other industrialized countries and less than the money spent for one fighter-bomber.
Tinier is better in the minuscule world of trapped ions, which are used in research on quantum entanglement and quantum computing.
Freeman's even tinier The New Inequality: Creating Solutions for Poor America (Beacon Press) briefly advances some plausible policy ideas--but Wilson's public notoriety as President Clinton's favorite sociologist insures that his proposals will draw more attention than if the same recommendations were propounded by a less renowned academic.