timing


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

face time

1. noun In-person interaction with someone. If only I could get some face time with one of those directors, I just know I could convince them to make my script into a movie.
2. verb, slang To video chat with someone using the app FaceTime. In this usage, the phrase is usually stylized as one word, like the app's name. I FaceTimed Tim earlier and he seems to be feeling better. I couldn't go home for Thanksgiving, so I FaceTimed my family instead.
See also: face, time

time in

1. noun An amount of time that was spent in (some place). We had the most amazing time in Puerto Rico. I will always treasure my time in Vancouver.
2. verb To officially record the beginning of one's day or shift at work. A noun or pronoun can be used between "time" and "in." We'd like to remind all employees that they will not be paid for any work they have completed until they have timed in for that shift. Sarah's going to be a couple of minutes late, so she asked me to time her in. I keep forgetting to time myself in when I get into the office.
See also: time

time out

1. noun A brief pause, break, or hiatus from something. I wish I had taken time out before starting this job—that might have kept me from getting burned out so quickly, Take time out for lunch. Work will still be here when you get back.
2. noun In sports, an official break in play allotted to each team. Sometimes hyphenated. They had better take a time-out here to set up a play. They burned their time-outs earlier in the half, so they have none remaining.
3. noun A punishment for young children who have misbehaved that consists of secluding them from activities and other people for a brief period of time. Sometimes hyphenated. If you keep throwing your toys like that, I'm going to give you a time out! I think he might need a time-out.
4. verb To cease or suspend operation, especially after being idle for a certain period of time. The demo of the video game will time out after 15 minutes. To save power and reduce the risk of harming the display, computer monitors are set to time out after 20 minutes of inactivity.
5. interjection Stop the clock. Said during sporting events. Time out, ref! One of our guys is injured.
6. interjection By extension, stop talking or doing what you're doing. OK, wait, time out—you didn't tell me that you and Tom were dating again! Time out! We are not driving this car another foot if you are going to keep acting like this!
See also: out, time

timing is everything

The success of something is often related to when it happens. You shouldn't start a new business during an economic recession—timing is everything. Timing is everything in relationships. I love Renee, but I want to get married, and she just isn't ready to settle down yet.
See also: everything, timing

two-time

To cheat on one's romantic partner (by having a relationship with someone else). After I found out that Jed was two-timing me with the woman next door, I left that lowlife!

time in

to record one's arrival time. Did you remember to time in this morning? When did she time in?
See also: time

time out

 
1. to record one's departure time. Did you remember to time out when you left work? I timed out at the regular time.
2. a call for officially stopping the clock in a game. Time out! Wally is injured!
See also: out, time

time someone in

to record someone's arrival time. I timed you in at noon. Where were you? My job is to time in people.
See also: time

time someone out

to record someone's departure time. Harry had to time everyone out because the time clock was broken. I had to time out everyone.
See also: out, time

two-time someone

Sl. to cheat on or betray one's spouse or lover by dating or seeing someone else. When Mrs. Franklin learned that Mr. Franklin was two-timing her, she left him. Ann told Bob that if he ever two-timed her, she would cause him a lot of trouble.

time out

A short break from work or play; also, a punishment for misbehavior in young children in which they are briefly separated from the group. For example, People rush around so much these days that I think everyone should take some time out now and then , or We don't throw food, Brian; you need some time out to think about it. This expression comes from a number of sports in which it signifies an interruption in play where the officials stop the clock, for purposes of rest, making a substitution, or consultation. Its figurative use dates from the mid-1900s.
See also: out, time

time out

v.
Computer Science To cease functioning after a period of idle time has elapsed: The server connection times out after 15 minutes.
See also: out, time

face time

n. time spent face to face with someone. (As opposed to over the telephone or by email, etc.) I need to have more face time with my children.
See also: face, time

two-time

tv. to deceive one’s lover. Sam wouldn’t two-time Martha. He just wouldn’t!
References in periodicals archive ?
If the earnings rate is determined to be unreasonably high, the overstated portion of the earnings is treated as an additional amount deferred, separately subject to the special timing rule.
A second special rule regarding the timing of FICA is the rule of administrative convenience.
Some 250 very good thermal-beam clocks generate the timing data from which the Paris bureau calculates an approximate time reference, or "flywheel," for the world.
Notice 98-31 states that an examining agent proposing an adjustment with respect to a timing issue will treat the issue as an accounting method change.
(At worst, there could be a small timing difference between years.) The IRS and the company also agreed that this would not preclude the IRS from testing Subpart F of some CFCs even though there was less than the agreed level of foreign tax credits involved.
Some ask if TAA isn't really just market timing. Market timing does reappear from time to time, usually under a new alias.
Sometime just before practice starts the kicker, snapper, and holder should get together and work on timing. Time is a very critical factor.
Timing: Let's say that the typical, time it takes to relocate a 5,000 SF tenant is 15 weeks.
But even after NASA upgraded the software and resumed shuttle flights, military and research missions critically dependent on launch timing continued to preempt the telescope's deployment.
The element of timing must now be taken into consideration.