timing


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timing is everything

The success of something is often related to when it happens. You shouldn't start a new business during an economic recession—timing is everything. Timing is everything in relationships. I love Renee, but I want to get married, and she just isn't ready to settle down yet.
See also: everything, timing

time out

1. noun A brief pause, break, or hiatus from something. I wish I had taken time out before starting this job—that might have kept me from getting burned out so quickly, Take time out for lunch. Work will still be here when you get back.
2. noun In sports, an official break in play allotted to each team. Sometimes hyphenated. They had better take a time-out here to set up a play. They burned their time-outs earlier in the half, so they have none remaining.
3. noun A punishment for young children who have misbehaved that consists of secluding them from activities and other people for a brief period of time. Sometimes hyphenated. If you keep throwing your toys like that, I'm going to give you a time out! I think he might need a time-out.
4. verb To cease or suspend operation, especially after being idle for a certain period of time. The demo of the video game will time out after 15 minutes. To save power and reduce the risk of harming the display, computer monitors are set to time out after 20 minutes of inactivity.
See also: out, time

two-time

To cheat on one's romantic partner (by having a relationship with someone else). After I found out that Jed was two-timing me with the woman next door, I left that lowlife!

face time

1. noun In-person interaction with someone. If only I could get some face time with one of those directors, I just know I could convince them to make my script into a movie.
2. verb, slang To video chat with someone using the app FaceTime. In this usage, the phrase is usually stylized as one word, like the app's name. I FaceTimed Tim earlier and he seems to be feeling better. I couldn't go home for Thanksgiving, so I FaceTimed my family instead.
See also: face, time

time out

 
1. to record one's departure time. Did you remember to time out when you left work? I timed out at the regular time.
2. a call for officially stopping the clock in a game. Time out! Wally is injured!
See also: out, time

time someone out

to record someone's departure time. Harry had to time everyone out because the time clock was broken. I had to time out everyone.
See also: out, time

two-time someone

Sl. to cheat on or betray one's spouse or lover by dating or seeing someone else. When Mrs. Franklin learned that Mr. Franklin was two-timing her, she left him. Ann told Bob that if he ever two-timed her, she would cause him a lot of trouble.

time out

A short break from work or play; also, a punishment for misbehavior in young children in which they are briefly separated from the group. For example, People rush around so much these days that I think everyone should take some time out now and then , or We don't throw food, Brian; you need some time out to think about it. This expression comes from a number of sports in which it signifies an interruption in play where the officials stop the clock, for purposes of rest, making a substitution, or consultation. Its figurative use dates from the mid-1900s.
See also: out, time

time out

v.
Computer Science To cease functioning after a period of idle time has elapsed: The server connection times out after 15 minutes.
See also: out, time

face time

n. time spent face to face with someone. (As opposed to over the telephone or by email, etc.) I need to have more face time with my children.
See also: face, time

two-time

tv. to deceive one’s lover. Sam wouldn’t two-time Martha. He just wouldn’t!