time and tide wait for no man

time and tide wait for no man

The opportunities of life will pass you by if you delay or procrastinate in taking advantage of them. You've had so many chances to get research grants or earn a master's degree, but you never get around to applying for any of them. You're going to end up stuck in the same dead-end career for your whole life, if you're not careful—time and tide wait for no man.
See also: and, man, no, tide, time, wait

Time and tide wait for no man.

Prov. Things will not wait for you when you are late. Hurry up or we'll miss the bus! Time and tide wait for no man. Ellen: It's time to leave. Aren't you finished dressing yet? Fred: I can't decide which necktie looks best with this shirt. Ellen: Time and tide wait for no man, dear.
See also: and, man, no, tide, time, wait

time and tide wait for no man

One must not procrastinate or delay, as in Let's get on with the voting; time and tide won't wait, you know. This proverbial phrase, alluding to the fact that human events or concerns cannot stop the passage of time or the movement of the tides, first appeared about 1395 in Chaucer's Prologue to the Clerk's Tale. The alliterative beginning, time and tide, was repeated in various contexts over the years but today survives only in the proverb, which is often shortened (as above).
See also: and, man, no, tide, time, wait

time and tide wait for no man

if you don't make use of a favourable opportunity, you may never get the same chance again. proverb
Although the tide in this phrase is now usually understood to mean ‘the tide of the sea’, it was originally just another way of saying ‘time’, used for alliterative effect.
See also: and, man, no, tide, time, wait

time and tide wait for no man

Stop procrastinating; do it now. This old proverb is usually interpreted to mean that the course of neither time nor the seas’ tides can be halted or delayed, so you’d better get on with what you’re supposed to do. An early version (1592) stated, “Tyde nor time tarrieth no man.” Later it was “Time and tide for no man stay.” Sir Walter Scott was fond of the present locution, using it several times. There are versions in German and French as well.
See also: and, man, no, tide, time, wait
References in periodicals archive ?
Attributed to 15th-century English poet Geoffrey Chaucer is the phrase 'Time and tide wait for no man.' William Shakespeare wrote, 'There is a tide in the affairs of men, which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune.' This meant that ships had to sail when the tide was at its highest and then flowing out to sea.
It's fun for all the family and guaranteed to keep an international audience glued to their TV sets as Britain reminds the world that the spirit of Canute is not dead and that time and tide wait for no man, especially not tourists.
Time and tide wait for no man as Dan Reddington will sadly testify.
Coun John Smith, highways spokesman for the council, said: "Time and tide wait for no man and there are very few places in the country that face the same logistical challenges ( but I know our workforce will be do another excellent job."
THEY say that time and tide wait for no man, but it appears that the whole universe has no choice but to wait for a baby.
Sea o'clock TIME and tide wait for no man but at least you could keep track of the seas with this tide clock.
Time and tide wait for no man ( so for BT workmen completing one of their most unusual jobs, it will be a race against the rising waters.
Time and tide wait for no man - as an unlucky motorist discovered.
Time and tide wait for no man (when there is a tide).
Time and tide wait for no man ( so for workmen repairing the Holy Island causeway it will be a race against the rising waters to resurface the road.
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