time


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Related to time: Time zones
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time

informal A term of imprisonment. Used especially in the phrase "do time." Did you hear that Rick's an ex-con? He did time back in the '70s. Looks like she's going to be doing some time for her role in the embezzlement scheme.

time out

1. noun A brief pause, break, or hiatus from something. I wish I had taken time out before starting this job—that might have kept me from getting burned out so quickly, Take time out for lunch. Work will still be here when you get back.
2. noun In sports, an official break in play allotted to each team. Sometimes hyphenated. They had better take a time-out here to set up a play. They burned their time-outs earlier in the half, so they have none remaining.
3. noun A punishment for young children who have misbehaved that consists of secluding them from activities and other people for a brief period of time. Sometimes hyphenated. If you keep throwing your toys like that, I'm going to give you a time out! I think he might need a time-out.
4. verb To cease or suspend operation, especially after being idle for a certain period of time. The demo of the video game will time out after 15 minutes. To save power and reduce the risk of harming the display, computer monitors are set to time out after 20 minutes of inactivity.
5. interjection Stop the clock. Said during sporting events. Time out, ref! One of our guys is injured.
6. interjection By extension, stop talking or doing what you're doing. OK, wait, time out—you didn't tell me that you and Tom were dating again! Time out! We are not driving this car another foot if you are going to keep acting like this!
See also: out, time
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

time (out)

Stop everything for just a minute! "Hey, stop a minute! Time out!" yelled Mary as the argument grew in intensity. Right in the middle of the discussion, Alice said, "Time!" Then she announced that dinner was ready.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
`Now, it is very remarkable that this is so extensively overlooked,' continued the Time Traveller, with a slight accession of cheerfulness.
`Yes, I think I see it now,' he said after some time, brightening in a quite transitory manner.
We speak of what is white as large, because the surface over which the white extends is large; we speak of an action or a process as lengthy, because the time covered is long; these things cannot in their own right claim the quantitative epithet.
(2) However much we approximate the time of judgment to the time of the deed, we never get a conception of freedom in time.
So as time went on these well-known tales came to be told in many different ways, changing as the times changed.
Hence in all such cases, we should be unable to recognise the parent-form of any two or more species, even if we closely compared the structure of the parent with that of its modified descendants, unless at the same time we had a nearly perfect chain of the intermediate links.
The murderer was about to strike her on the head with the mutton-bone--a terrible weapon in the hands of a Larsan or Ballmeyer; but she fired in time, and the shot wounded the hand that held the weapon.
"And did your worship eat anything all that time, senor?" asked the cousin.
`If you knew Time as well as I do,' said the Hatter, `you wouldn't talk about wasting IT.
He was the first of the writers of great Anna's time whom I knew, and he made me ready to understand, if he did not make me understand at once, the order of mind and life which he belonged to.
From the time of our parting till their death we kept up a correspondence with the older members of the family, and in later years we have kept in touch with those who were the younger members.
Just about this time, I got hold of a book entitled "The Columbian Orator." Every opportu- nity I got, I used to read this book.
She was also so spiteful that she gladly devoted all her time to carrying out all the mean or ill-natured tricks of the whole body of fairies.
The patient had obtained a `card' from the hospital some time before; and when her time came it was taken to the porter by a messenger, generally a little girl, who was then sent across the road to the house in which Philip lodged.
I stood still for some time. The sight of her had made me very happy.