tight money


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tight money

n. money that is hard to get. In these days of tight money, no new expenditures will be approved.
See also: money, tight
References in periodicals archive ?
It would look like the Fed had switched from an easy to a tight money policy, but in fact we would simply be observing the delayed effect of the same easy money policy.
As for Volcker's tight money, its largest effects occurred after the election.
Banks on an average have been borrowing nearly Rs 1 lakh crore from RBI daily due to tight money supply conditions.
The simple question, in this day and age of tight money, is why should the majority of Council Tax payers have to cover costs incurred by single interest groups, whatever the event in question?
He said the parks maintenance division is facing budget cuts and questioned spending tight money to accommodate the Axemen, a relatively small park "user group."
While on the one side the Eurozone crisis and significantly lower foreign capital inflows impacted the country's growth prospects, the RBI's tight money policy curtailed credit flow into the economy which reflected in sharp decline in industrial production.
Therefore the flow of credit to the commercial sector has not been affected by the tight money policy between the two years.
In that kind of tight money environment an RC department's go-ahead for capital purchases may be infrequent.
Bev Thomas and Marcia Shakespeare, the mums of Charlene and Letisha, said: "We are well aware of just how tight money is at the moment.
Britain also pursued tight money to keep its own currency valued at prewar levels, in order to protect the creditor class.
A stronger dollar, as we saw in the mid 1990s (Clinton) and early 1980s (Reagan) spawns deflation in the Gulf as the regional central banks are forced to track the Fed's tight money with higher dirham, dinar and riyal rates, even though local economic distress argues exactly the opposite.
Given how tight money is, no government can afford to ignore such a guarantee - our current incumbents in Westminster have started by welcoming the re-introduction of competitive sport in schools.
In tight money times, city leaders still tend to ignore sewer and water systems in favor of more visible public works.
I think that's a terrific turn-out, particularly given how tight money is at the moment.
This is not totally new to our readers, of course--they've always been challenged by tight money and tough, demanding markets.