tick off

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tick off

1. To make someone particularly annoyed, angry, or frustrated. A noun or pronoun can be used between "tick" and "off." It really ticks me off the way people drive in the bus lane, when they clearly aren't supposed to! Nothing ticked off my mom more than having people come into the house with dirty shoes.
2. To make a mark next to an item on a list to indicate it as present, acquired, completed, etc.; to check off. A noun or pronoun can be used between "tick" and "off." I picked up some bananas on the way home, so you can tick those off the list. We'll be done as soon as everything on the list has been ticked off.
3. To complete or acquire an item on a list. A noun or pronoun can be used between "tick" and "off." I have a few more accomplishments I'd like to tick off before I turn 40.
4. To list or enumerate something, often several things, without much effort. A noun or pronoun can be used between "tick" and "off." Rob can tick off so many bands that I've never even heard of. If you're having trouble remembering that formula, just ask Denise—she can tick it off with no problem.
See also: off, tick

tick someone off

to make someone angry. That really ticks me off! Doesn't that tick off everyone?
See also: off, tick

tick off

Infuriate, make angry. For example, That article ticked me off. [Colloquial; second half of 1900s] For a vulgar synonym, see piss off.
See also: off, tick

tick off

v.
1. To make someone angry or annoyed: Constant delays ticked me off. The arrogant actor ticked off the director.
2. To mark some item on a list with a check or tick: The teacher ticked off each name as the roll was called. As the guests arrived, we ticked them off the list.
See also: off, tick

tick someone off

tv. to make someone angry. (see also ticked (off).) That really ticks me off!
See also: off, someone, tick

ticked (off)

mod. angry. Kelly was so ticked!
See also: off, tick
References in periodicals archive ?
Vollmer ticks them off as follows: "Rest, sleep, positive experiences, sex, moderate exercise, relaxation, prayer, and cool water."
Tourtellottee ticks them off: the discovery that patients with Parkinson's disease lack dopamine, a chemical messenger that transmits nerve cell signals in the brain, which led to the development of a new therapy; the finding that there is a 90% decrease in chlorine acetyltransferase in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients; the disclosure of certain immune T cells in the inflammatory lesions in the brains of MS patients, linking the cells with active extension of the lesion; and the finding of measles virus in the brains of MS people (as well as in some healthy persons).