tick

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Related to ticks: Lyme disease

tick all the (right) boxes

To satisfy or fulfill everything that is necessary or desired. Primarily heard in UK. Of course, a prospective employee may tick all the right boxes on paper but might not be suited to the job once they're actually working for you. His newest thriller ticks all the boxes the author's fans will be hoping for.
See also: all, box, tick

tick over

1. Of an engine, to run at an idle pace in neutral while the vehicle is not moving. Primarily heard in UK. I won't stay any longer, as I've left the car ticking over outside.
2. To continue operating steadily but uneventfully. Primarily heard in UK. A: "How are things lately, Jeff?" B: "Just ticking over, can't complain really." They decided to leave one person in charge to make sure business ticked over during the long break.
3. To record or be recorded, as on a clock or other mechanical counting device. The Irish squad will be glad to see the first half tick over, as they'll need to regroup if they want to beat this Italian team. The taxi's meter had just ticked over £35 when we pulled into Heathrow Airport.
See also: over, tick

go on tick

To purchase something on credit. "Tick" is short for "ticket," a note that showed one's debt (although this practice is less common today). Primarily heard in UK. I had to go on tick for a bunch of last-minute purchases because I've already spent so much on this trip! Well, if you need groceries and won't get paid for another week, just go on tick.
See also: on, tick

what makes (one) tick

The things that motivate someone; the reasons why a person behaves in a certain way. I'd love to sit you down for an interview and find out what makes you tick. Growing up hearing about her grandfather's heroic deeds in the war are a major part of what makes Janet tick.
See also: make, tick, what

*full as a tick

very full of food or drink. (Alludes to a tick that has filled itself full of blood. See also tight as a tick. *Also: as ~.) Little Billy ate and ate until he was as full as a tick. Our cat drank the cream until he became full as a tick.
See also: full, tick

make someone or something tick

Fig. to cause someone or something to run or function. (Usually with what. Tick refers to a watch or clock.) I don't know what makes it tick. What makes John tick? I just don't understand him. I took apart the radio to find out what made it tick.
See also: make, tick

tick away

[for seconds or minutes] to go by as the clock ticks. The seconds ticked away as the fateful time got closer. As time ticked away, the surgeons worked feverishly to repair the walls of Roger's heart.
See also: away, tick

tick someone off

to make someone angry. That really ticks me off! Doesn't that tick off everyone?
See also: off, tick

ticked (off)

angry. Wow, was she ticked off! Kelly was totally ticked.
See also: tick

*tight as a tick

 
1. very tight. (Fig. on the image of a tick swollen tight with blood or of a tick stuck tightly in someone's skin. *Also: as ~.) This lid is screwed on tight as a tick. The windows were closed—tight as a tick—to keep the cold out.
2. intoxicated. (Fig. on full as a tick. *Also: as ~.) The old man was tight as a tick but still lucid. The host got tight as a tick and fell in the pool.
3. [of a race] close, as if the racers are moving very closely together. (*Also: as ~.) This election is as tight as a tick.
4. very friendly and close; as thick as thieves. (*Also: as ~.) Those two are tight as a tick. They are always together.
See also: tick, tight

what makes someone tick

Fig. something that motivates someone; something that makes someone behave in a certain way. (Fig. on what makes something tick.) William is sort of strange. I don't know what makes him tick. When you get to know people, you find out what makes them tick.
See also: make, tick, what

what makes something tick

Fig. the sense or mechanism that makes something run or function. (With reference to the ticking of a clock representing the functioning of the clock.) I don't know what makes it tick. I took apart the radio to find out what made it tick.
See also: make, tick, what

tick off

Infuriate, make angry. For example, That article ticked me off. [Colloquial; second half of 1900s] For a vulgar synonym, see piss off.
See also: off, tick

tight as a tick

Drunk, as in She was tight as a tick after just one glass of wine. This expression alludes to a tick engorged with the blood of the animals it feeds on. [Slang; mid-1800s]
See also: tick, tight

what makes one tick

What makes one function characteristically, what motivates one, as in We've never figured out what makes these chess players tick. This expression alludes to tick in the sense of "function as an operating mechanism, such as a clock." [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
See also: make, one, tick, what

on tick

on credit. informal
Tick is an abbreviation of ticket , a note recording money or goods received on credit.
See also: on, tick

what makes someone tick

what motivates someone. informal
See also: make, tick, what

tight as a tick

extremely drunk. informal
The simile as full as a tick occurs in a late 17th-century proverb collection, referring to the way in which the blood-sucking insects swell as they gorge themselves. In the modern expression, there is a play on tight as an informal synonym for ‘drunk’ and its literal meaning ‘stretched taut’, like a tick satiated with blood.
See also: tick, tight

half a ˈminute, ˈtick, ˈsecond, etc.

(informal) (wait) a very short time: I’ll be with you in half a moment! I’ve just got to put my coat on.Just give me half a tick, will you? I’ve left the keys upstairs.
See also: half

get, buy, etc. something on ˈtick

(old-fashioned, British English, informal) get food or other goods and pay for them later: You can only buy things on tick in small shops where they know you well. Tick is probably a short form of ticket and referred to the written note (an IOU) given by a person borrowing something to the lender as proof that they would pay them back or return the goods.
See also: on, something, tick

ˌtick something off on your ˈfingers

check a list of things by saying them aloud, and touching your fingers one after another at the same time
See also: finger, off, on, something, tick

what makes somebody ˈtick

(informal) what makes somebody behave or think in the way they do: I’ve never really understood what makes her tick.Money is what makes him tick.
Tick here is the sound a watch or clock makes as the hands move forward every second.
See also: make, somebody, tick, what

tick away

v.
1. To function characteristically or well: That old car is still ticking away.
2. To be gradually depleted. Used of an interval of time: The final seconds ticked away.
See also: away, tick

tick by

v.
To pass. Used of time: As the minutes ticked by, we became worried that we would miss the train.
See also: tick

tick off

v.
1. To make someone angry or annoyed: Constant delays ticked me off. The arrogant actor ticked off the director.
2. To mark some item on a list with a check or tick: The teacher ticked off each name as the roll was called. As the guests arrived, we ticked them off the list.
See also: off, tick

tick over

v.
1. To be recorded on some mechanical counting device: When the second quarter of the game ticked over, the home team was leading by two points.
2. To record something. Used of a mechanical counting device: The clock ticked over the ninetieth minute, and the game ended in a tie. As the car's odometer ticked the fifth mile over, we began looking for the turn.
3. To function characteristically or well. Used chiefly in the progressive: Because everyone works hard, the business is really ticking over.
See also: over, tick

(as) tight as a tick

1. mod. very tight. The windows were closed—tight as a tick—to keep the cold out.
2. mod. alcohol intoxicated. (An elaboration of tight.) The host got tight as a tick and fell in the pool.
See also: tick, tight

tight as a tick

verb
See also: tick, tight

a few ticks

n. a few minutes; a few seconds. Just wait. I’ll be there in a few ticks.
See also: few, tick

tick

n. a minute; a second. (see also sec.) This won’t take a tick. Sit tight.

tick someone off

tv. to make someone angry. (see also ticked (off).) That really ticks me off!
See also: off, tick

ticked (off)

mod. angry. Kelly was so ticked!
See also: off, tick

ticked

verb
See also: tick

tick-tock

(ˈtɪktɑk)
1. n. a heart. (see also ticker.) My tick-tock is as strong as an ox’s.
2. n. a watch or clock. (Juvenile.) Wind your tick-tock before you forget.
References in periodicals archive ?
Initially, these studies were funded internally, and their focus was to identify ticks submitted from around the state and to test them for Rocky Mountain spotted fever.
In nymphal acquisition feeding, 10 engorged nymphs were tested individually, and all were found to be infected with SFTSV; however, only 20% (2/10) of the adults ticks derived from the nymphs were infected with SFTSV (Table 1).
We continue to be surprised by the number of ticks carrying Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia miyamotoi throughout the Bay Area, and believe more research into the connections between human disease and strains and species of bacteria is critical," said Dan Salkeld, PhD, a disease ecologist working at Colorado State University and formerly with The Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.
Walkers need to check for ticks and use insect repellant containing the chemical DEET.
If any ticks are found, they will be removed and placed in a labelled tube.
Question: I recently heard about tick fever in dogs, which I think is more prevalent in summer.
In addition to transmitting disease, ticks can cause irritation, pain, and swelling at attachment sites, otoacariasis (invasion of the auditory canal), paralysis, allergic reactions, and anaphylactic reactions.
Ticks, like fleas, leave their host and can wait in the undergrowth for the next one to come by.
Heartland Virus was first found in two Missouri farmers in 2009, and it is most often found in Lone Star ticks common in the South and East.
Winter ticks differ from other ticks, having only one host.
Ticks may be very carefully removed by a vet but great care must be taken not to leave the tick's mouth parts behind or these can form an abscess.
The ticks fall off the birds once they've reached the United States, where they probably die due to colder temperatures and a lack of hosts to feed on, experts say - likely the reason they have not yet established in the country.
The presence of ticks in the great outdoors was not traditionally a huge cause for concern as they were generally restricted to the further flung echelons of the UK and were only at large for limited parts of the year.
Beginning with Chapter 3, and continuing through Chapter 13, each chapter describes invasive ticks from a particular part of the world, including Africa, Afro-Caribbean region, Afro-Asian region, Afro-European region, Afro-Eurasian region, Europe, Eurasia, Asia, Australoasian-Asiatic region, Australia, and the Americas.