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'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all.

Prov. Love is such an important experience that even the pain of losing someone you love is better than not having loved that person. (A line from Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem, "In Memoriam A. H. H.") Tom: I've been so miserable since Nancy and I broke up. I wish I'd never met her. Fred: Come on, now—'tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all.
See also: all, and, better, have, lost, love, never

Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise.

Prov. If knowing something makes you unhappy, it would be better not to know it. (Also the cliché: ignorance is bliss.) Ellen: The doctor didn't tell Dad that Mom probably won't recover from her illness. Do you think we should tell him? Bill: No. It would only make him unhappy and ruin their last months together. Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise.
See also: folly, ignorance, wise

ill wind that blows no one any good, it's/'tis an

Someone or other usually benefits from a misfortune or loss. This expression appeared in John Heywood’s 1546 proverb collection and several of Shakespeare’s plays. Today it remains current, often shortened simply to an ill wind. Laurence McKinney punned on it in People of Note (1940), saying of the notoriously difficult oboe, “It’s an ill wood wind [sic] no one blows good.”
See also: any, blow, ill, no, one, that, wind