ti


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get rid of (someone or something)

To discard, eliminate, or become free from something or someone. We finally got rid of your younger brother, he's so annoying! Would you please get rid of that filthy couch already?
See also: get, of, rid

Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all.

proverb Having experienced real love in one's life is worth the pain of losing it, compared to never having experienced such love in the first place. This now-clichéd line comes from the Alfred, Lord Tennyson poem "In Memoriam A. H. H." Sometimes shortened to "'tis better to have loved and lost." A: "I can't believe she left. It just feels like there's a gaping hole in my chest." B: "I know it hurts. But you knew true love, which is something not many people experience. 'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all." Whoever said "'tis better to have loved and lost" never had to spend six months in divorce court.
See also: and, better, have, lost, love, never, Ti

tis the season

Used to indicate that something is appropriate to or indicative of the Christmas season. A: "Do we really have to listen to 'Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer' again?" B: "Come on, 'tis the season!" A: "Wow, that was so generous of you! You really didn't have to go out of your way like that, Sarah!" B: "Ah, it was no bother, and I wanted to bring you a little happiness. 'Tis the season, after all!"
See also: season, ti

where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise

proverb It is better to remain unaware or ignorant of things that may otherwise cause one stress; if you don't know about something, you don't need to worry about it. From the 1742 poem "Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College," by Thomas Gray. I feel like all the news in the world today is depressing, and the only way to get on with your life is to completely ignore it all. As they say, where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise. Look, I know you get stressed about what the kids eat when they stay at your mother's house, but they're happy and have plenty of energy. When ignorance is bliss, it's folly to be wise.
See also: folly, ignorance, wise
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all.

Prov. Love is such an important experience that even the pain of losing someone you love is better than not having loved that person. (A line from Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem, "In Memoriam A. H. H.") Tom: I've been so miserable since Nancy and I broke up. I wish I'd never met her. Fred: Come on, now—'tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all.
See also: all, and, better, have, lost, love, never

Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise.

Prov. If knowing something makes you unhappy, it would be better not to know it. (Also the cliché: ignorance is bliss.) Ellen: The doctor didn't tell Dad that Mom probably won't recover from her illness. Do you think we should tell him? Bill: No. It would only make him unhappy and ruin their last months together. Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise.
See also: folly, ignorance, wise
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ill wind that blows no one any good, it's/'tis an

Someone or other usually benefits from a misfortune or loss. This expression appeared in John Heywood’s 1546 proverb collection and several of Shakespeare’s plays. Today it remains current, often shortened simply to an ill wind. Laurence McKinney punned on it in People of Note (1940), saying of the notoriously difficult oboe, “It’s an ill wood wind [sic] no one blows good.”
See also: any, blow, ill, no, one, that, wind
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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