thunder

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(as) black as thunder

Full of rage or hostility, likened to the black clouds that accompany thunderstorms. When I looked up, his face was as black as thunder, and I knew that I was in trouble.
See also: black, thunder

son of thunder

A speaker who attracts listeners by using an impassioned, often aggressive, delivery. The phrase originated in the Bible. I can't listen to that son of thunder bluster about his idiotic worldview anymore. A son of thunder has everyone mesmerized in the town square right now.
See also: of, son, thunder

blood and thunder

A spoken piece or performance that is loud and impassioned. I don't think you'll fall asleep during this play—I hear it's all blood and thunder.
See also: and, blood, thunder

have a face like thunder

To have a facial expression that shows one's anger or hostility. When I looked up, he had a face like thunder, and I knew that I was in trouble.
See also: face, have, like, thunder

risk of rain

 and risk of showers; risk of thunder(-storms)
a chance of precipitation. (Used only in weather forecasting. There is no "risk" of hazard or injury involved.) And for tomorrow, there is a slight risk of showers in the morning. There is a 50 percent risk of rain tonight.
See also: of, rain, risk

steal someone's thunder

Fig. to lessen someone's force or authority. What do you mean by coming in here and stealing my thunder? I'm in charge here! someone stole my thunder by leaking my announcement to the press.
See also: steal, thunder

thunder across something

Fig. to move across something, making a rumbling sound. The jets thundered across the sky, heading for their home base. As the race car thundered across the track, people strained to get a better view.
See also: across, thunder

thunder past someone or something

Fig. to move past someone or something, rumbling. As the traffic thundered past, I wondered why there was so much of it. The train thundered past the sleeping town.
See also: past, thunder

thunder something out

Fig. to respond with words spoken in a voice like thunder. He thundered the words out so everyone could hear them. He thundered out the words.
See also: out, thunder

steal someone's thunder

Use or appropriate another's idea, especially to one's advantage, as in It was Harold's idea but they stole his thunder and turned it into a massive advertising campaign without giving him credit . This idiom comes from an actual incident in which playwright and critic John Dennis (1657-1734) devised a "thunder machine" (by rattling a sheet of tin backstage) for his play, Appius and Virginia (1709), and a few days later discovered the same device being used in a performance of Macbeth, whereupon he declared, "They steal my thunder."
See also: steal, thunder

thunder

blood and thunder

BRITISH
If you talk about blood and thunder in a performance, you mean powerful emotions, especially anger. Coach Berti Vogts grew increasingly frustrated with an absence of blood and thunder from his team. Note: You can also talk about a blood-and-thunder performance or performer. In a blood-and-thunder speech, he called for sacrifice from his people.
See also: and, blood, thunder

a face like thunder

BRITISH
If someone has a face like thunder, they look extremely angry. The kitchen had flooded and Mick was stalking around the house with a face like thunder. Mr Clarke had a face like thunder after his assistant's mistake.
See also: face, like, thunder

steal someone's thunder

If someone steals your thunder, they do something that stops you from getting attention or praise, often by doing something better or more exciting than you, or by doing what you had intended to do before you can do it. It's too late for rivals to take advantage. They couldn't steal our thunder. Note: You can also say that someone steals the thunder from you. I think O'Connor will steal some of the thunder from Read, as his book is out first. Note: This expression may come from an incident in the early 18th century. A British playwright, John Dennis, invented a new way of making the sound of thunder for his play `Appius and Virginia'. However, the play was unsuccessful and soon closed. Soon afterwards, Dennis went to see a production of `Macbeth' by another company and found that they had stolen his idea for making thunder sounds. He is said to have jumped up and accused them of stealing his thunder.
See also: steal, thunder

blood and thunder

unrestrained and violent action or behaviour, especially in sport or fiction. informal
Blood and thunder is often used to describe sensational literature, and in the late 19th century gave rise to penny bloods as a term for cheap sensational novels.
See also: and, blood, thunder

steal someone's thunder

win praise for yourself by pre-empting someone else's attempt to impress.
The critic and playwright John Dennis ( 1657–1734 ) invented a new method of simulating the sound of thunder in the theatre, which he employed in his unsuccessful play Appius and Virginia. Shortly after his play had finished its brief run, Dennis attended a performance of Macbeth in which the improved thunder effect was used, and he is reported to have exclaimed in a fury: ‘Damn them! They will not let my play run, but they steal my thunder.’
See also: steal, thunder

blood and ˈthunder

(informal) sensational and very dramatic incidents in plays, films/movies, stories, contests, etc: I don’t like blood-and-thunder novels.
See also: and, blood, thunder

his, her, etc. face is like ˈthunder

,

he, she, etc. has a face like ˈthunder

somebody looks very angry: ‘What’s wrong with Julia?’ ‘I don’t know, but she’s had a face like thunder all morning.’
See also: face, like, thunder

steal somebody’s ˈthunder

spoil somebody’s attempt to surprise or impress, by doing something first: He had planned to tell everyone about his discovery at the September meeting, but his assistant stole his thunder by talking about it beforehand.In the eighteenth century, the writer John Dennis invented a machine that made the sound of thunder for use in his new play. The play was not a success, and was taken off and replaced by another play. When Dennis went to see the other play, he was angry to hear his thunder machine being used and complained that ‘...they will not let my play run, but they steal my thunder’.
See also: steal, thunder

thunder-boomer

n. a thunderstorm. There will be thunder-boomers in the boonies tonight.

thunder-thighs

n. big or fat thighs. (Cruel. Also a rude term of address.) Here, thunder-thighs, let me get you a chair or two.

steal (someone's) thunder

To use, appropriate, or preempt the use of another's idea, especially to one's own advantage and without consent by the originator.
See also: steal, thunder
References in classic literature ?
Thus saying, from her side the fatal Key, Sad instrument of all our woe, she took; And towards the Gate rouling her bestial train, Forthwith the huge Porcullis high up drew, Which but her self not all the STYGIAN powers Could once have mov'd; then in the key-hole turns Th' intricate wards, and every Bolt and Bar Of massie Iron or sollid Rock with ease Unfast'ns: on a sudden op'n flie With impetuous recoile and jarring sound Th' infernal dores, and on thir hinges great Harsh Thunder, that the lowest bottom shook Of EREBUS.
At the same moment, and in the midst of the terrifying silence which usually follows a clap of thunder, they heard a knocking at the door.
Then a broad ribbon of fire seemed to drop on to the tower of Castra Regis just as the thunder crashed.
There was then a profound silence, as if the thunder had withdrawn into itself.
As the thunder showed no signs of withdrawing, but seemed massed right overhead, while the lightning aimed straight at the garden every time, an uneasy gloom replaced the first excitement.
Finishing the meal very quickly, people congregated in the hall, where they felt more secure than in any other place because they could retreat far from the windows, and although they heard the thunder, they could not see anything.
So with crashing of chords and thunder of melody the act went on.
The curtain descended amidst a thunder of applause.
Let the thunder rumble; what if it threaten ruin to farmers' crops?
How long they stood and watched the stately procession of breakers, rising from out the deep and wind-capped sea to froth and thunder at their feet, Saxon did not know.
The mighty mass of water fell in thunder on the beach, but beyond appeared a yellow head, one arm out-reaching, and a portion of a shoulder.
It was before this ruinous building that the worthy couple paused, as the first peal of distant thunder reverberated in the air, and the rain commenced pouring violently down.
He was preparing to ascend a steep staircase, or rather ladder, leading to another floor of warehouses above: when a bright flash of lightning streamed down the aperture, and a peal of thunder followed, which shook the crazy building to its centre.
The wind began to moan in hollow murmurs, as the sun went down carrying glad day elsewhere; and a train of dull clouds coming up against it, menaced thunder and lightning.
Drenched with the pelting rain, confused by the deafening thunder, and bewildered by the glare of the forked lightning, they would have passed a solitary house without being aware of its vicinity, had not a man, who was standing at the door, called lustily to them to enter.