throw (one's) weight behind (someone or something)

(redirected from throwing his weight behind)

throw (one's) weight behind (someone or something)

To wield one's influence or power to support or promote someone or something. The small-town candidate is hoping the senator throws his weight behind him in the race. If we can get a corporation to throw its weight behind our charity campaign, we can raise even more money.
See also: behind, throw, weight

throw your weight behind something

COMMON If you throw your weight behind a person or plan, you do everything you can to support them. The U.S. government is promising now to throw its weight behind the peace negotiations. Northern Ireland's three newly elected MEPs have all thrown their weight behind the campaign. Western governments have thrown their weight behind the leader.

throw your weight behind someone

use your influence to help support someone. informal
2000 South African Times U.K. Tony Blair and…Bill Clinton have thrown their weight behind a South African-engineered ‘Marshall Plan’ to rescue the developing world from deepening poverty.
See also: behind, someone, throw, weight
References in periodicals archive ?
And he blasted the Ibrox board as "highly dysfunctional" before throwing his weight behind Jim McColl's bid to take over the club.
ED Miliband was throwing his weight behind demands for a "living wage'' of more than pounds 7 an hour today as he seeks to bolster his bid for the Labour leadership.
He is one of many throwing his weight behind the Back the Ban campaign which is being launched on Boxing Day.
A huddersfield fashion designer is throwing his weight behind a fundraising ball to support two charities.
VAN NUYS - City Councilman Tony Cardenas announced his support Tuesday for an alternative proposal for Van Nuys Airport's master plan, throwing his weight behind a compromise to allow development for lucrative jets while preserving space for small propeller planes.
CHRISTY Moore is throwing his weight behind the national launch of an immigrants' rights organisation.
Staffordshire-based Eddie Straiton, aged 81, known for 30 years as the BBC TV Vet, is throwing his weight behind a move to check the spread of a ragwort, a weed that poses a major threat to livestock.