throw (something) into question

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throw (something) into question

To cause something to be doubted, scrutinized, or a matter for serious discussion. These series of protests have thrown into question the ability of this government to remain in power. This reluctance to act is bound to throw your leadership skills into question.
See also: question, throw
References in periodicals archive ?
Following the demise of Neath in the summer it would be a disaster for the Welsh Premier to lose another high profile team and it would throw into question the viability of the top tier.
That would throw into question Bolton's ability to fulfil Saturday's scheduled Premier League game at home to Blackburn.
They also throw into question BA's repeated assertion that this is an airline in peril.
The figures throw into question King's claim that his recovery plan, Making Sainsbury's Great Again, has been completed ahead of schedule.
The claims will throw into question the England boss's judgment.
The letters have been freely circulating among SPL and SFL clubs and throw into question claims Caley Thistle were unfairly treated by five SPL clubs who refused to sanction their promotion to the top flight earlier this week.
He said: 'The fact that we used some of his work does not throw into question the accuracy of the document as a whole, as he himself acknowledged (when) he said that in his opinion the document overall was accurate.
And doesn't this throw into question Greenblatt's homology with Hamlet's mockery mentioned above (which perhaps now must be identified with a more specifically Catholic "eucharistic anxiety")?
But I believe that this conflict of interest, which allows bookmakers to take bets at tracks which they themselves own, has the potential to throw into question the entire integrity of greyhound racing.
The suggestion could throw into question the issue of weapons decommissioning in Northern Ireland and endanger the peace process.
In addition, such a change would throw into question all U.
Paul Carroll, Chairman of World Wide, stated that "conditions in the uranium market at present and in the foreseeable future are so bleak that they throw into question whether the industry will ever be viable again.