three sheets to the wind


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Related to three sheets to the wind: The whole nine yards

three sheets to the wind

Severely intoxicated from alcohol, to the point of finding control of one's actions or coordination difficult. Taken most likely from nautical terminology, where a "sheet" is the rope that controls the sails of a tall ship; if several sheets are loose or mishandled, the boat's movement becomes unsteady and difficult to control, like that of a drunk person. On his 21st birthday, Jeff's friends took him to every bar in town until he was three sheets to the wind.
See also: sheet, three, wind

three sheets to the wind

Also, three sheets in the wind. Drunk, inebriated, as in After six beers he's three sheets to the wind. This expression is generally thought to refer to the sheet-that is, a rope or chain-that holds one or both lower corners of a sail. If the sheet is allowed to go slack in the wind, the sail flaps about and the boat is tossed about much as a drunk staggers. Having three sheets loose would presumably make the situation all the worse. Another explanation holds that with two or four sheets to the wind the boat is balanced, whereas with three it is not. [Mid-1800s]
See also: sheet, three, wind

three sheets to the wind

OLD-FASHIONED, INFORMAL
If someone is three sheets to the wind, they are drunk. He's probably three sheets to the wind down at Toby's, wondering where he left his truck. Note: On a boat, the ropes that control the position of the sails are called sheets. If the sheets are left hanging loose, the sails flap freely in the wind and cannot be controlled.
See also: sheet, three, wind

(be) three sheets to the ˈwind

(old-fashioned) (be) drunk: By 11 o’clock he was three sheets to the wind and we had to take him home in a cab. OPPOSITE: stone-cold soberThis idiom comes from sailing: if three sheets (= the ropes attached to the sails) are loose, the wind blows the sails about and the boat moves in a very unsteady way.
See also: sheet, three, wind

three sheets

verb
See also: sheet, three

three sheets to the wind

verb
See also: sheet, three, wind

three sheets

to/in the wind Informal
Intoxicated; drunk.
See also: sheet, three

three sheets to the wind

Very drunk. Despite what it sounds like to nonsailors, a “sheet” isn't a sail. It's the rope that secures the sail's edge or corner to the mast or the vessel itself. A sheet that comes loose flaps erratically, much like a drunken sailor weaving his way back to the ship after a night's alcoholic revelry. Three sheets blowing in the wind would be even worse.
See also: sheet, three, wind
References in periodicals archive ?
Highlights of the weekend include dub poet Lillian Allen, Shawna Dempsey (Finger in the Dyke), seasoned musicians Heather Bishop, Lucie Blue Tremblay, and Sherry Shute as well as Three Sheets to the Wind (see Herizons review Spring '96 issue), the Unceded Band featuring Gloria Mae Eshkibok and harpist Mary Anderson.
HE was constantly going out on patrols, some times alone, sometimes with a sergeant, and he always looked three sheets to the wind.
The song Three Sheets to the Wind had a very strong melody but I had no intention of adding horns and honky tonk piano until the very end.
But even that pales beside Ms Church's habit of being photographed when three sheets to the wind, she collapses outside clubs, her knickers and breasts visible to all-comers.
He gets three sheets to the wind on the five nights he's in London, and he uses the other one to sleep under.
And who could ignore a vast quantity of quality ales with intriguing names like Baggy Wrinkle Bitter, Three Sheets To The Wind, Ginger Snap, Orange & Black Pepper, Passionfruit, Mango, Mandarin and Pineapple.
She ends up hitting the demon drink once again and, while three sheets to the wind, she makes a pass at Shirley.
There was a large group of Irishmen aboard, off the boat in Holyhead and clearly three sheets to the wind on landfall.
IT is well documented that the great Brian Clough had a drink problem but I doubt if the Derby and Nottingham Forest legend ever missed a game because of being three sheets to the wind.
And in my mind, most people who hang around betting shops while three sheets to the wind are harmless enough.
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