though


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Related to though: thru

as though

Similar to, likened to, or fashioned after something like it were the truth. So many bad things happened all at once, it's as though life itself were against me. He acts as though he's some famous author, though really he's only ever published a single short story.
See also: though

make as though

To behave as if; to pretend or make it appear that. Mark's boyfriend always makes as though he cares deeply about other people's problems, but he's never willing to actually help. Samantha's been making as though she's writing the next great American novel, but it's just some trashy thriller.
See also: make, though

as if

1. Like. I have such a terrible headache—I feel as if my head is going to explode. I did tell her that I wouldn't be home for dinner tonight. It's as if she doesn't listen to me at all!
2. An interjection indicating complete dismissal of what has been said or suggested, implying that it is not the case or would never happen. A: "Tim thinks he's going to go to the prom with you." B: "As if! I'd rather go by myself."
See also: if

make as if

To behave as if; to pretend or make it appear that. Mark always makes as if he cares deeply about other people's problems, but he's never willing to actually help. Samantha's been making as if she's writing the next great American novel, but it's just some trashy thriller.
See also: if, make

even though

In spite of (something). Even though it rained, we still had a great time at the parade.
See also: even, though

for all the world as if (someone or something)

Exactly; in every way. Wow, you look for all the world as if you did something wrong—why the guilty face?
See also: all, if, world

for all the world as though (someone or something)

Exactly; in every way. Wow, you look for all the world as though you did something wrong—why the guilty face?
See also: all, though, world

it isn't as though

It isn't true or correct that; it is not the case that. Usually used to point out a misinterpretation or misperception. I'm just holding onto the funds until the company's new account is set up—it isn't as though I'm going to keep them for myself! It's not as though she couldn't handle the work herself. She's just being lazy!
See also: though

look as though (one) has seen a ghost

To look terrified, shocked, or pale from fright. What's wrong, Daniel? You look as though you've seen a ghost! The test was so nerve-racking that I came away looking as though I had seen a ghost.
See also: ghost, look, seen, though

reverberate through (something or some place)

Of a sound, to fill and resound through something or some place in a series of loud echoes. The singer's booming voice reverberated through the dance hall. The sound of gunshots has been reverberating through the war-torn city for weeks.
See also: reverberate, through

reverberate throughout (something or some place)

Of a sound, to fill and resound throughout something or some place in a series of loud echoes. The singer's booming voice reverberated throughout the dance hall. The sound of gunshots has been reverberating throughout the war-torn city for weeks.

as if

Also, as though. As it would be, as in He decided to accept, as if it really mattered, or John scowled as though he were really angry. The first idiom dates from the late 1500s, the variant from the late 1700s. Also see make as if.
See also: if

make as if

Also, make as though; make like. Behave as if, pretend that. For example, Jean made as if she really liked the soup, or Dad made as though he had not heard them, or She makes like she's a really important person. The first two usages date from the early 1500s; the third, a colloquialism, dates from the late 1800s.
See also: if, make

do something like it's going out of style

or

do something as though it's going out of style

If you do something like it's going out of style or as though it's going out of style, you do it a lot and with great energy. My grandkids eat this dish like it's going out of style. These footballers have been spending money as though it was going out of style.
See also: going, like, of, out, something, style

as ˈif

(spoken) used to express anger at or disapproval of a suggestion, an explanation, etc., or to deny a possibility: As if I really cared!‘Don’t tell Tom I said that, will you?’ ‘Oh, as if (I would)!’
See also: if

as if/as though

in a way that suggests something: He behaved as if nothing had happened.It sounds as though you had a good time.
See also: if, though

it isn’t as if/as though

,

it’s not as if/as though

used to show that a particular explanation for something is not the correct one: It isn’t as if he didn’t recognize me! He just walked straight past me as I stood there.
See also: if, though

even if/though

in spite of the fact or belief that; no matter whether: I’ll get there, even if I have to walk.I like her, even though she can be annoying at times.
See also: even, if, though

ˈmuch as/though

although: Much as I’d like to stay, I really must leave now.He agreed, much though he disliked the idea of selling the business.
See also: much, though

for all the ˈworld as if/though...

,

for all the ˈworld like somebody/something

(written) exactly as if...; exactly like somebody/something: She stood up and shouted at him, then sat down and went on with her work for all the world as if nothing had happened.
See also: all, if, world
References in classic literature ?
The scout regarded Heyward in surprise, and then lifting his cap, he answered, in a tone less confident than before-- though still expressing doubt.
Behind these, the runner leaned against a tree, where he stood the close examination of the scout with an air unmoved, though with a look so dark and savage, that it might in itself excite fear.
She prizes the bauble among her dearest possessions, though it has made her an enemy in the Sheriff's proud daughter.
Presently they heard some one coming up the road whistling gaily, as though he owned the whole world and 'twas but made to whistle in.
And as we kept always together, so we grew very intimate, yet he never knew that I was not a man, nay, though I several times went home with him to his lodgings, according as our business directed, and four or five times lay with him all night.
Through the window of the warehouse we saw, lying on the counter or showboard, which was just before it, five pieces of silks, besides other stuffs, and though it was almost dark, yet the people, being busy in the fore-shop with customers, had not had time to shut up those windows, or else had forgot it.
Lady Middleton expressed her sense of the affair about once every day, or twice, if the subject occurred very often, by saying, "It is very shocking, indeed!" and by the means of this continual though gentle vent, was able not only to see the Miss Dashwoods from the first without the smallest emotion, but very soon to see them without recollecting a word of the matter; and having thus supported the dignity of her own sex, and spoken her decided censure of what was wrong in the other, she thought herself at liberty to attend to the interest of her own assemblies, and therefore determined (though rather against the opinion of Sir John) that as Mrs.
His chief reward for the painful exertion of disclosing past sorrows and present humiliations, was given in the pitying eye with which Marianne sometimes observed him, and the gentleness of her voice whenever (though it did not often happen) she was obliged, or could oblige herself to speak to him.
After soaking two years and then lying high six months it was perfectly sound, though waterlogged past drying.
But I was interested in the preservation of the venison and the vert more than the hunters or woodchoppers, and as much as though I had been the Lord Warden himself; and if any part was burned, though I burned it myself by accident, I grieved with a grief that lasted longer and was more inconsolable than that of the proprietors; nay, I grieved when it was cut down by the proprietors themselves.
Though I called him poor Partridge in the last paragraph, I would have the reader rather impute that epithet to the compassion in my temper than conceive it to be any declaration of his innocence.
She had, however, somewhat better success with Mrs Blifil, who was, as the reader must have perceived, a much better-tempered woman, and very kindly undertook to solicit her brother to restore the annuity; in which, though good-nature might have some share, yet a stronger and more natural motive will appear in the next chapter.
Forthwith from every Squadron and each Band The Heads and Leaders thither hast where stood Their great Commander; Godlike shapes and forms Excelling human, Princely Dignities, And Powers that earst in Heaven sat on Thrones; Though of their Names in heav'nly Records now Be no memorial, blotted out and ras'd By thir Rebellion, from the Books of Life.
A deeper shade of hauteur overspread his features, but he said not a word, and Elizabeth, though blaming herself for her own weakness, could not go on.
Of Simonov's two visitors, one was Ferfitchkin, a Russianised German --a little fellow with the face of a monkey, a blockhead who was always deriding everyone, a very bitter enemy of mine from our days in the lower forms--a vulgar, impudent, swaggering fellow, who affected a most sensitive feeling of personal honour, though, of course, he was a wretched little coward at heart.